Br. Geoffrey TristramMatthew 16:26

Over this past week, I have had the privilege of leading a retreat for men and women who are preparing for ordination.  We’ve been reflecting on, and praying about the mystery of vocation.  And “vocation” is the theme of the days of this week, which are called Ember Days.  Each day this week we have been praying for those who have a vocation, and in particular those who have been called to ministry.

Today is the last of these Ember Days, and today’s collect is about vocation – but it’s about your vocation and mine.  “We pray for all members of the holy church, that in their vocation and ministry they may truly and devoutly serve you.”

If you have been baptized, then you have a vocation!  So what is a vocation?  Some people think it must be something that you suddenly get.  You’re walking along quite happily one day, and God suddenly “zaps” you with a vocation!  I don’t think that’s quite right.  I believe that your vocation is that which lies at the very heart, the very core of your identity.   It is discovering who it is that you most truly are.

There are particular moments in life, perhaps when you experience something, meet someone, hear some words, which touch that deep core within, and it resonates.  And you say – Oh – that’s who I am, or that’s what I want to do or be in life.  Sometimes you forget it, or you try to put it out of your mind, if it doesn’t fit in with other plans.  But it usually comes back, and deep down, you just know that it’s truly who you are meant to be.

There are some enigmatic words spoken by Jesus in today’s Gospel, which I think speak to the theme of vocation.  He says, ‘What will it profit you if you gain the whole world, but forfeit your life?”  I think that you can “forfeit your life” deliberately and consistently ignore that inner prompting, the call of your core identity.  You can say no to your vocation.  You can choose a life more in keeping with your parents’ wishes, social convention, or simply greater security and wealth.

God never forces us to say “yes.”  We are always free to choose.  But God, who knows the secrets of our hearts, will never stop calling us, inviting us, enticing us, to live the life for which we have been made.  These hard Gospel words will always resonate in us, and challenge us: “What will it profit you if you gain the whole world, but forfeit your life?”  So, choose life.

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7 Comments

  1. Jeanne DeFazio on June 26, 2020 at 09:56

    Sharing this today.

    live the life for which we have been made. These hard Gospel words will always resonate in us, and challenge us: “What will it profit you if you gain the whole world, but forfeit your life?” So, choose life.

  2. Ann Trousdale on June 26, 2020 at 08:15

    I wonder, is there a difference between something calling you and God calling you? There are also cases where God calls (and equips) people to something they would not have otherwise chosen. Witness the major prophets. Witness Paul, the calling of Peter and Andrew and James and John. This kind of calling (vocation) does happen too. It happened to me.
    This is not to say that God does not call otherwise than through a recognizable voice. But when one begins to experience some of the trials and difficulties of full-time ministry, knowing that it was God who called you is sometimes all that gets you through.

  3. Diane on June 26, 2020 at 08:12

    Well, I don’t have a religious vocation, although I am at heart a person of faith. I have followed that path the majority of my life. I’m a Christian. Baptized as a Lutheran. As an adult, attended an Episcopal Church for many years. Then began attending a Lutheran Church. Because of the pandemic, this church is open (to shelter people) but the services are closed. Thank you, thank you for the daily homilies. It’s my part of my morning routine. Thank you again.

  4. Jackie Bridges on June 23, 2019 at 17:23

    I have always been immensely blessed to live my dreams. Thankyou Lord- Most especially with my Doggie Resort: Mountain Mamma Bed and Biscuit in Boone NC- The people I meet and the way I listen to their sharing leaves me fulfilled with making a difference. Caring for beloved pets also serves God when I can make a difference in human and animal lives. Now I am 66 and it is time to pass this rewarding profession home and land to someone else whereas it will fulfill their dreams. I know it is the right time to sell. Ill still have my 7 dogs to take with me to another home

  5. Dee Dee on June 21, 2019 at 15:11

    One of my favorite sermons. Gives me hope and strengthens my resolve to keep paying attention and to say yes when God calls me to give more of myself to life — even if it’s sometimes scary or doesn’t seem logical to me; even if others don’t understand and even if it sometimes causes me pain and heartbreak — saying yes to God always enriches my life, and hopefully enriches the lives of those with whom God connects me.

  6. Meg Graham on June 21, 2019 at 08:15

    Prayer of King Henry VI traditionally sung at Kings College Cambridge captures this memorably.

  7. John Backman on June 21, 2019 at 07:33

    Very well put. The sweet and daunting thing about saying yes, I am finding, is that further down the road God invites us to do other things too, and often we’re too in love to say no. None of these “other things” are ever easy, and a lot of them don’t make “rational” sense!

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