Look at who God has brought into your life: those people who know you and love you and who can confirm (or not) your sense of where God is drawing you. Listen to your wise friend. They might just stop you from embarking on a very unwise journey!

-Br. Geoffrey Tristram, SSJE

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Turn away from those things that are consuming your time and attention and look for what is teeming with the light of joy in your life. Jesus has taught that we will see God most in the face and countenance of those we encounter from day to day.

-Br. Jim Woodrum, SSJE

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In a moment when things are bleak, when the future is unbearable, when all that is left is a dead, lifeless stump, Isaiah reminds God’s people that God will act, that a shoot shall come out of the stock of Jesse. This, after all, is the way of God. Life does emerge from death. Hope does spring up, when all seems hopeless. God will act, and righteousness and justice will be restored.

-Br. James Koester, SSJE

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The process of emptying ourselves for God is essential, because as glorious a gift to us as Mary’s role of god-bearer is, it isn’t truly relevant to our own spiritual journeys if it’s just history. As we begin the season of Advent, let us practice transforming our hearts from busy inns where there’s no room, into quiet, welcoming mangers.

-Br. Nicholas Bartoli, SSJE

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God’s prophets splash us in the face like cold water. We may sputter in disbelief, we may fail to understand, but we are definitely left more awake, called to attention in a new way, made to see with a deeper gaze, from a wider angle. We are baptized once, and life is forever changed. But we are also baptized again and again by living confrontations with angels.

-Br. Keith Nelson, SSJE

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Dear friends,
We all need chances to start over from time to time.  The beginning of a new liturgical year is one of these times for me, but really any day will do.  Every day has the potential of becoming the starting point for a new habit or practice, or for renewing a relationship that already exists but that has grown  stale or conflicted.  What in your life could use a fresh start?

We stand at the threshold of a new liturgical year.[i]  This season of Advent, of course, is a time of waiting and expectation and even longing, as we anticipate the celebration of our Lord’s birth at Christmas.  The practice of celebrating Jesus’ birth on December 25th was initiated by Pope Julius I around the year 350.  Since the exact date of Jesus’ birth was unknown, the choice of December 25th was rather arbitrary, but not completely random.  A number of cultures in Europe already had festivals that marked the winter solstice (December 21).  The Romans celebrated Saturnalia, a month-long holiday honoring Saturn, the god of agriculture; and it is commonly believed that the Church chose the 25th of December in an effort to adopt and absorb the traditions of the pagan Saturnalia festival.  Some Romans also marked the birthday of Mithra, the god of the unconquerable sun, on December 25.  The Church’s feast was first call “the Feast of the Nativity” and the practice of observing it on the 25th of December spread to Egypt by 432, and to England by the end of the sixth century.

Festivals on or near the winter solstice were celebrations that anticipated the coming of longer days and the return of light.  For Christians, celebrating the birth of the Savior at this time of the year was a way of adapting and transforming popular pagan beliefs and practices and infusing them with new meaning.  Jesus, the “Light of the World,” had come, and was coming, to banish our darkness and illumine our lives with his radiant presence.

As we enter this particular season of Advent, we recognize that we all have been living through a period of intense darkness associated with the Covid-19 pandemic.  While we had hoped that this season of sickness would be short-lived, in reality it has continued to plague us for months beyond the medical community’s initial projections, and though the prospect of a vaccine has shed some light of hope on the road ahead, we have been warned that there is more sickness and death in our immediate future.  So we continue to hold on, doing what we can to curb the spread of the disease, taking care not only of the sufferers but of their caregivers, and of one another, enduring the darkness until the light shines once more.

Perhaps these circumstances will deepen our experience of Advent this year, as we persevere, waiting for the light’s return to banish the temporary rule of darkness.

God bless you all in this holy season.  We pray for you, we encourage you, we love you.  Stand fast.

On behalf of the SSJE Brothers,
David Vryhof, SSJE

There is not a single Christian who has not been equipped by God for the particular tasks which God has given him or her. There are no exceptions. All of us are ministers of God and ministers of the Church. All of us have been equipped in some way to participate in this important mission.

-Br. David Vryhof, SSJE

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Thanksgiving orders our hearts and minds rightly. We learn to thank God not because God needs our thanks, but because by thanking God we learn to use God’s gifts rightly and justly—both the material and the immaterial. Our joyful gratitude to the Giver keeps us from misusing the good things given us, according to God’s mercy and grace.

-Br. Sean Glenn, SSJE

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Tithing is an Old Testament principle, giving ten percent of what we have and hold to God. If you were to ask me if “tithing” is an important principle for today, I would say “no.” I think the invitation is not for 10 percent but for 100 percent. We are trustees of 100 percent of the life entrusted to us by God. The question then becomes how we should spend our lives, being the gifts that they are.

-Br. Curtis Almquist, SSJE

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St. John of the Cross says, What are you really after? Do you want spirituality? Mystical experience? Nice warm feelings in your prayer? Or do you want God? If you want God you must let go of all substitute satisfactions. To go into the darkness with faith, trust, and loving desire for God, however distant he may seem, can be one of life’s greatest journeys.

-Br. Geoffrey Tristram, SSJE

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