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Looking Ahead: Chapel Closure

The Chapel and Guest House will close after Evening Prayer on Sunday, 29 July. We will resume our regular liturgical schedule on Tuesday, 28 August. During this time the Brothers will be on our annual community retreat, as well as having time for community Chapter and Discussions and vacations.

Farewell to Our Summer Seminarians

Yesterday we bid farewell to our three Summer Seminarians: Sam Aldred (St. Stephen’s House, Oxford), John Kennedy (Berkeley Divinity School at Yale) and Elizabeth Phyu (Virginia Theological Seminary). We were pleased to hear each of them preach in the Chapel over the last few weeks. We invite you to check out the wonderful sermons they shared with us:

Who Is Jesus Christ? – Sam Aldred
Reprogramming the Heart – John Kennedy
Shine Your Light
– Elizabeth Phyu

We hope you’ll join us in bidding them farewell and Godspeed.

Many Years!

Congratulations to our Brother David Allen, who celebrated the fifty-seventh anniversary of his profession in our Society on Sunday, July 1. In our Rule of Life, we read: “We pray that seeds planted in many years of faithful life will bear fruit in old age.  Our older brothers will then be able to contribute their experience of what is essential in our life with God, a sense of perspective, wisdom, their appreciation for the community and joy in the younger members. The elders of the community are to be honored as the bearers of our corporate memory who link us with our past.” We hope you will join with us in praying with thanksgiving for Br. David’s continued witness and ministry.

The Laying on of Hands and Anointing

The Church’s Sacramental Ministry of Healing with the Laying on of Hands and Anointing with Prayer for Healing will next be offered on Sunday, 1 July at the 9:00 AM Eucharist and on Tuesday, 17 July at the 5:30 PM Eucharist. We hope that you will join us and partake of this ministry.

Reprogramming the Heart – Guest Preacher: John Kennedy

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Turn my eyes from watching what is worthless; give me life in your ways.
(Psalm 119:37)

On many, many occasions in my millennial life, more than I care to recall or admit, I have lifted my head, refocused my eyes, and come to my frazzled senses after mindlessly staring at my iPhone or computer, those glowing rectangles of distraction and dispersion in front of which I spend an alarming percentage of my time. In those moments I think, “What did I just waste my time on?”

It’s often then that I find myself with the prayer we just heard in the Psalm on my heart and in my mind: “Turn my eyes from watching what is worthless; give me life in your ways.” In other translations, it reads “turn away mine eyes from beholding vanity,” and “avert my eyes from seeing falsehood.”

Vanity, falsehood, worthless. These words pretty well describe the substance of much of the digital content so effectively designed to capture my monetized attention. The fascinating thing is that this verse appears in Psalm 119, a prayer of one whose heart delights in the law of God. By including this petition for God to keep his eyes from what is worthless, the writer shows that the inclinations of the heart are inextricably bound up with the things our eyes behold. Read More

Emery House Spring Work Weekend

The weekend of May 18th, Brs. Geoffrey Tristram, Curtis Almquist, and Sean Glenn hosted a wonderful group of volunteers at Emery House for our Spring Work Weekend. Among the volunteers were 5 former SSJE Interns (from the Monastery and Emery House) – a wonderful reunion. The work projects varied from planting spring flowers in the gardens, to weeding, splitting firewood, and trimming along the 18th century stone walls.  We prayed and worshipped, ate well, worked hard, slept soundly, and shared a good many laughs throughout the weekend.

Goodbye is Enough – Amy Nizolek

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Acts 20:28-38; Ps 68:28-36; John 17:11b-19

Goodbye. What a simple word. What a simple, mundane, commonplace, disquieting, difficult, dreadful, shattering little word. Goodbye.

As a general rule, we humans are not fond of endings. Even when we ponder our plans for the future with genuine excitement, we can’t help but drag our feet at the threshold. We would like to step forth confidently on a new adventure with our left foot while keeping our right foot firmly planted on its old familiar turf. But life doesn’t work that way. Whether we like it or not, endings happen to all of us, and Goodbye is their calling card. Goodbye is what we say both to those we adore and to those we barely know when we walk out of a room or walk out of their lives entirely. Goodbye is the last turn of the key in the lock as we leave one home for the next. Goodbye is the acknowledgement of a distinct past and a distinct, separate future.

When these moments of change come, we are faced with the task of acknowledging the break in continuity. Speaking broadly, it is considered good manners to say Goodbye and not just slip out when no one is looking. But more often than not, when we are the ones taking our leave, facing our loved ones and saying Goodbye can be more than we can bear. How often have we heard someone say, “When it’s my time, I hope I go without warning. Just here one minute, gone the next.” This is frequently billed as the (quite rational) desire not to suffer or burden one’s family with a drawn-out illness. But there’s more to it than that. For many of us, actually leaving is the easy part. The hard part is figuring out what to say when we do. Read More

Small Beauties – Lydia Simmons

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Wisdom 7:7-14 & John 8:25-32

“All good things came to me along with her,
And in her hands uncounted wealth.
I rejoiced in them all, because wisdom leads them;
But I did not know that she was their mother.”

We all have an intuitive relationship with goodness, beauty, and truth. We come across things in the world that seem to reach out and grab us by the heart – perhaps a piece of art or music, a holy place, a human relationship, a piece of philosophy or Scripture that brings joy and light into our life. These things are good because they are from God, and we rejoice in them even before we know that God is their mother. We rejoice in them because they are like signposts, pointing the way back to Wisdom and helping us to desire and understand her.

But the things that lead us to God are not, themselves, God. All the truth and beauty we know in this life will inevitably disappoint us from time to time. We find that something beautiful no longer moves us, or that something true no longer convinces or reassures us, and we are left in the dark without any signposts to remind us that eternal Wisdom is out there. Read More