We Brothers welcome you to a share one of our daily practices: listening to and reflecting on a chapter of our Rule of Life.

In addition the Brothers have a series of other resources that we hope might be helpful to you in exploring living with a Rule.

Living Intentionally: Creating a Rule of Life

We invite you to download our Living Intentionally Workbook for Creating a Personal Rule of Life. Walk with Br. David Vryhof step-by-step through the process of writing your own Rule.

A Framework for Freedom:

We invite you to discover the freedom that comes from living by a rule of life, by journeying through “A Framework for Freedom,” a 7-week self-guided video course to help you say “Yes” to your life.  Watch the series now.  Subscribe to a daily email.

In Lent 2012, we preached a series on the challenges and rewards of living by a rule of life. Drawing on chapters from SSJE’s Rule. Read and listen to the sermons.

A Living Tradition:

Each day of Lent 2011, we posted a short “living commentary” on our Rule, with a Brother or two offering his unique perspective on the document which shapes and forms our prayer and practice more than any other apart from Scripture and The Book of Common PrayerTo read that conversation, click here.

 

We Brothers welcome you to a share one of our daily practices: listening to and reflecting on a chapter of our Rule of Life.

  • To listen to the SSJE Rule of Life, read aloud by a brother, click on the chapters to the left.
  • To read a Guide to Personal Reflection, click here
  • To Subscribe to the SSJE Rule of Life, click the subscribe buttons on the left.
  • We welcome comments on each chapter.
  • To purchase a copy of the book The Rule of Life, click here

The audio book, The Twelve Days of Christmas, is read by Br. Curtis Almquist and accompanied by carols sung by the Brothers.

The Twelve Days of Christmas follow from December 25 until January 6, the Feast of the Epiphany, the traditional date when the Magi arrived to present gifts to infant Jesus. For many, the meaning of these days is lost. By Christmas night we are saturated with the holiday hype, overfed by music and food, and may already be disappointed that the presents received are not enough. This audio book is not a bah humbug about Christmas customs and presents.

This is simply an invitation to go deeper than the tinsel and wrappings, beyond the presents given and received, to the source of all the good gifts in life. Readers are invited to unwrap gifts that will last, praying the twelve days of Christmas.

When Jesus came back to see his Apostles, Jesus showed his wounds. He showed his wounds as if to say, I am the real the deal, I’ve been to hell and back, and I’ve got the scars to prove it. Healing is a process we’ve all been through. Healing centers us and gives us a reason to get out of bed in the morning. Healing helps us find God where we need God most – which isn’t always where we want God most.

-Br. Jack Crowley, SSJE

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In the human body of the crucified Son, God has definitively removed the veil and shown the world what God’s reign actually looks like. A giving away of self that answers the violence and self-centeredness of the world with forgiveness. A power made perfect in weakness, suffering the infliction of evil to disarm and swallow it up in the ever-greater divine love.

-Br. Sean Glenn, SSJE

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Please note the following changes to our live-streaming worship schedule for 4/20 and 4/21: Because of our community retreat day on Wednesday, 4/21, we will not be praying Compline on Tuesday 4/20 or Evensong on Wednesday 4/21. Please plan to join us again for live-streaming worship beginning with Evensong at 6pm on Thursday, 4/23.

Acts 5:12-26

This spring we’ve watched as a pair of morning doves built a nest on the outdoor crucifix located in our cloister garden.  Nestled on the shoulder of the crucified Jesus, the mother sat motionless on her eggs for days and days.  At last the chicks emerged.

I had the extraordinary good fortune to be watching the nest this past Monday evening.  The two chicks are now adolescents, about 2/3 the size of their adult parents and darker in coloring.  They were sitting side by side in the nest, eagerly looking out on the world.  Their mother appeared and, standing on the head of the crucified Jesus, she fed them.  Then she flew off and perched nearby where she could keep a close eye on them.

You could tell there was something happening.  The young birds began rocking back and forth in the nest, as if working up their courage to leave the warmth and security of the nest.  Finally, one of them took the leap.  It flapped wildly around the cloister, unable to control its flight, banging into the walls and ceiling until it finally fell stunned to the floor.  The second one readied itself for its first flight, rocking in the nest before finally launching its body into the air.  Like the first, it flapped wildly about, crashing into the ceiling and walls, and then landing on the floor.  It waited for a bit, then took off again, this time successfully navigating its way through the arches and out into the garden. Read More

To cling, to grab too tightly, is not love. It is fear. Fear that the one you love may leave, fear that unless you possess and control the object of your love you will enter into loneliness and despair. When Mary Magdalene first realizes she is speaking with none other than her risen Lord, Jesus immediately tells her not to hold onto him. Rather, he sends her away, instructing her to go to the twelve and tell them the Good News.

-Br. Lucas Hall, SSJE

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John 3:1-15

I have a special fondness for the story of Nicodemus, and not just because we share the same name. In 2010, after a few decades of suffering apparent separation between God and me, something happened. It was a very sudden something and it brought spiritual transformation, healing, and gratitude. At the time, the words which came spontaneously to mind describing the experience, the words that felt most true, where that it felt like being born again.

Not long after I found a church and when I told the rector about the “born again” experience she very gently suggested that I call it something else, perhaps a kind of spiritual awakening. I assumed she offered that advice because of the political reality associated with the phrase “born again.” Still, I’ve never forgotten that first Easter I celebrated, how there was an overwhelming and joyful recognition of the baptismal dying and rising of my self in Christ.

Back in the fourth century the sacrament of baptism was seen as the culmination of a Lenten journey, a journey of instruction, spiritual exercises, and ascetic disciplines. Those on this journey, the catechumens, were baptized on the Easter Vigil, a celebration of their participation in the death and resurrection of Christ. As a symbol of this dying and rising, they would enter a pool of water on one side, as entering into a tomb or womb, before emerging on the other side. Read More

The fruit of our resurrection – our rising by Christ, with Christ, and in Christ – is to live our lives as prayers of thanksgiving, bearing witness to God’s Truth, reflecting the Light of Christ, and serving in the Spirit of Love. So, show me your resurrection. Or, better yet, let’s show each other. Let’s show the world.

-Br. Nicholas Bartoli, SSJE

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Jesus said, “No one has greater love than this, to lay down one’s life for one’s friends.” This is how we come to know Jesus as the good shepherd: We shall fear no evil in the face of death, we are comforted by his direction and guidance. When we turn our lives over to Jesus, we will be able to pray with confidence: “Surely your goodness and mercy shall follow me all the days of my life, and I will dwell in the house of the Lord forever.”

-Br. Jim Woodrum, SSJE

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