Our sustenance and security can only ever be gifts of the Love that created us. No border can free or save us from the claims of such a dependence. It usurps every one of our identity claims.

-Br. Sean Glenn, SSJE

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There is nowhere outside the scope of God’s mercy. There are no boundaries within God’s mercy. There is no one outside God’s mercy – no one outside God’s compassion and loving kindness. This truth has the power to convert us, to change our lives. To be a neighbor is to show mercy to those in need, regardless of their race, religion, or country of origin.

-Br. Geoffrey Tristram, SSJE

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God’s salvation comes amid quick change and loss. Go now. There is no time to pack or prepare. We take what we have and adapt our routines, learning to bake bread without leaven. Salvation is a gift. It does not come on our terms, as we dream up, plan for, or prepare. God saves. We receive in motion.

-Br. Luke Ditewig, SSJE

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Jesus came in weakness rather than in might. He made himself one with the people, identifying especially with the lowly and poor, the outcasts and the marginalized, the powerless and the vulnerable. The evangelism he taught and demonstrated was an evangelism from below, not from above. So, too, we, when we experience the power of God at work in us and through us, remind ourselves that God’s power is most clearly evident in our weakness.

-Br. David Vryhof, SSJE

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Love of God can only be accomplished by committing to the equally large task of love of neighbor as self. This task is as big and daunting today as it was in Jesus’ day. The narrow way that leads to life takes the will and intention of commitment, the assent to experiencing inconvenience, the expectation of messiness, and the understanding that it will cost us all something, both individually and communally.

-Br. Jim Woodrum, SSJE

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What unites Peter and Paul is their weakness, what Paul calls “strength being made perfect in weakness.” In the end, both Peter and Paul were driven to practice what they preached. They could not save themselves. They needed, daily, to surrender to the intervention of Christ’s grace.

-Br. Curtis Almquist, SSJE

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Work is not bad. Even the most contemplative among us must work. But work serves an end. Even the holiest work of your life is not your purpose. It facilitates your purpose, and your purpose is encounter. The welcoming of the eternal, living God into your midst.

-Br. Lucas Hall, SSJE

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Your vocation is that which lies at the the very core of your identity. There are particular moments in life, perhaps when you experience something, meet someone, hear some words which touch that deep core within, and it resonates. And you say – Oh – that’s who I am, or that’s what I want to do or be in life. Sometimes you forget it, or you try to put it out of your mind, if it doesn’t fit in with other plans. But it usually comes back, and deep down, you just know that it’s truly who you are meant to be.

-Br. Geoffrey Tristram, SSJE

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We often discount the ordinary in our lives, forgetting that God is as likely to send angels when we are doing the dishes, working at some task, or having coffee with a friend, as when we are engaged in some grand and mighty scheme. The challenge for us is to pay attention.

-Br. James Koester, SSJE

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