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Vocation

Called to Greatness: The Call of David – Br. Geoffrey Tristram

Br. Geoffrey TristramI Samuel 16:1-13

From the First Book of Samuel, that great story of the calling and anointing of David.  I’ve always really loved this story.  It’s a kind of Cinderella story.  Here are all Jesse’s sons lined up in front of the prophet Samuel.  He looks at each one in turn: which one has the Lord chosen to be king?  The first one, Eliab.  He’s tall and good-looking.  He must be the one!  But no, says God.  Never mind about his appearance or his height – he’s not the one.  Nor the next one, nor the next one.  But surely, God, this one looks perfect to be king.  No, says God – never mind what he looks like.  “For the Lord does not see as mortals see.  They look on the outward appearance, but the Lord looks on the heart.”

And none of his sons are chosen.  Are you sure there’s no one else?  Well, says Jesse, there is the youngest (or in Hebrew it can also mean the smallest or the shortest).  It couldn’t possibly be him! – and anyway he’s out with the sheep.   Bring him in!  I need to see him!  He comes in, and immediately Samuel knows‘This is the one!’  And he anoints him with oil in the presence of all his brothers, and we read “The Spirit of the Lord came mightily on David from that day forward.”

Well, it’s a great story, and the reason I think I’ve always loved it is that I’m the youngest son in my family and I’ve got two older brothers.  Growing up I was always younger and shorter than them. Playing football (soccer) with them and their friends, they’d say, ‘Oh, you’re too small.  You can go in goal.  I hated being in goal and just standing around.  Boring!  You couldn’t run around with the ball. Read More

The Gift of Detours – Br. Jim Woodrum

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Br. Jim WoodrumExodus 13:17-22; Matthew 2:1-12

For a few of us brothers, one of the highlights of our pilgrimage to the UK this past summer was a trek to The Eagle and Child Pub in Oxford.  It was not necessarily for the food and beer that we wanted to visit this pub, although the Slow-cooked Steak, Amber Ale & Mushroom Pie is quite delicious.   Rather, the reason for this sacred journey was that this was a regular meeting place for a literary group known as “The Inklings,” of which C.S. Lewis and J.R.R. Tolkein were members.  Sitting in a cramped corner of this pub with Luke, Keith, Nicholas, and Lucas, I couldn’t help but to wonder if perhaps we were sitting at a table where Lewis and Tolkein might have sat, discussing literature, philosophy, religion, and theology.  One of my favorite poems from Tolkein’s epic trilogy The Lord of the Rings kept playing over and over in my head.  It begins:

All that is gold does not glitter,
Not all those who wander are lost;
The old that is strong does not wither,
Deep roots are not reached by the frost.[i] 

Indeed, this became my own personal mantra for the pilgrimage:  “Not all those who wander are lost!”  Tonight’s sermon is the second part of our Epiphany preaching series on vocation entitled Gifts for the Journey.  This evening we will explore:  The Gift of Detours. Read More

The King Whom We Serve – Br. James Koester

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Br. James Koester

Feast of Christ the King: Proper 29A
Ezekiel 34: 11 – 16, 20 – 24
Psalm 100
Ephesians 1: 15 – 23
Matthew 25: 31 – 46

We all know that a shift has taken place in the world, and we see it most clearly in last year’s election in this country and the BREXIT referendum in the UK. The shift appears to be away from a global, universal outlook to a more individual, nationalist one. Me First appears to be the watchword, and that has become true about nations as well as individuals. We see this in foreign as well as domestic policy, ranging from trade, to immigration, to security, to health, to education, to gun laws, to the environment, to civil and human rights. We see this as society becomes more stratified and neighbourhoods and communities more uniform. We are losing, or perhaps have lost, our concern for the other and appear to live in a culture that says that I can do whatever I want, and the other person, or neighbourhood, or nation, simply doesn’t matter. Some political commentators see evidence of this, not just at one end of the political spectrum, but at both ends. And some argue that this isn’t a recent phenomenon, but has its roots back several decades.

But this Me First attitude is in stark contrast to the kind of life we are trying to live as Christians, and as a Christian community. It is such a stark contrast, that I have spent some time pondering what it is that sets us apart from the world, and shapes our life as Christians in a fundamentally different way, so much so, that not only are we set apart from the world, sooner or later our values as Christians will set us in conflict with a world where a Me First attitude is king. And that, I think, is the key for us, at least for today: who or what is king over our lives? Who or what rules supreme in our lives? To whom or to what do we owe our ultimate allegiance? Read More

I Will With God’s Help – Br. Jim Woodrum

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Br. Jim WoodrumJonah 3:1-10

If God were to appear to you in a dream and tell you to travel to New York and walk through the center of Manhattan pronouncing God’s judgment and impending destruction of that city, how would you respond?  I suspect many of us would wake up and think, wow, that was a really strange dream and perhaps share it with friends for a laugh over a coffee or lunch break.  If we felt particularly disturbed by the dream, we might call our therapist or spiritual director to help process the feelings and emotions the dream conjured.  Somehow I suspect most if not all of us would eventually shrug it off and forget about it.  But what if this dream were to reoccur persistently?

In this evening’s Old Testament lesson we hear a portion of a comical story about Jonah who receives this very message from God.  This short book is only four chapters long start to finish and the introduction to Jonah in the New Oxford Annotated Bible states that he is never even called a prophet in the text.[i]  To add insult to injury, the book of Jonah is more about God’s dealings with the ‘prophet’ himself than with the recipients of Jonah’s message, therefore making Jonah the ‘circus clown’ of all the prophets.  His day starts out by getting a daunting assignment from God:  go to Nineveh, the capitol city of the hated and oppressive Assyrian Empire, and pronounce God’s judgment on them.  I don’t think there is a single one of us who blame Jonah for his response.  Jonah runs away and we shake our heads at him intuiting that this is only going to get worse. Read More

Remembering Dag Hammarskjöld – Br. Geoffrey Tristram

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Br. Geoffrey Tristram

On this day, in 1961, there was a plane crash in Central Africa and it took the life of Dag Hammarskjöld, who was the Secretary-General of the United Nations. He was an extraordinary man, and in the calendar of the Church we keep him on this day. He is kept as a memorial in the Church firstly because he was a man tirelessly committed to the cause of peace, who was willing to undertake the greatest personal sacrifice on its behalf. In fact, the plane which crashed in Africa was taking him on a very dangerous mission and most of the people in the UN didn’t want him to go, but he was very brave. He was going to negotiate a ceasefire between warring factions in the Congo.

The second reason Dag is remembered and honored in the calendar of the Church is because of what was found in his apartment in New York shortly after his death. It was a manuscript and it was full of journal entries. He wrote in it every day, and there were poems, and they (i.e. the journal entries) covered a period of several decades and revealed a rich, hidden life. No one knew it existed – and no one knew that this was what was going on deep within this man, within his inner life. They revealed a man of deep faith, whose courageous life of self-sacrifice was a direct result of what went on in those times of silence, often very early in the morning – times of passionate (prayer), sometimes wrestling (with God), sometimes commitment to God. Read More