Welcome to the Society of Saint John the Evangelist

Uncategorized

What Love Reveals – Br. James Koester

Play

Isaiah 43: 16 – 21
Psalm 126
Philippians 3: 4b – 14
John 12: 1 – 8

Some of you will remember that in the old daysthis Sunday in Lent went by the title of Passion Sunday. It was on this day that the liturgical colour changed from purple, or Lenten array, to red, but not the fiery red of Pentecost, rather the deep, dark, blood red of Passiontide. At the same time, the focus in the readings changed and they began to point, not to what Jesus was doing, and the miracles he was performing, but what would happen during that last week of his life.

In many ways, while the liturgical colour has not yet changed, and today is no longer called Passion Sunday, the same shift has happened, and the readings invite us to ponder the way of his suffering[1]They do that by pointing us to the day of [his] burial.[2]

The gospel for today is for me, one of the most tender of passages. It puts us back in the home of Mary, and Martha, and Lazarus. It is this family, you will remember, whom John tells us that Jesus loved.[3]It’s important to remember when thinking about this family in Bethany, that it is about this family that we hear for the first time, in John’s gospel, that Jesus loved someone. Yes, we hear in other places in the gospel of the love of the Father for the Son, and the Son for the Father. And we will hear about the disciple whom Jesus loved. But it is only when we arrive in this home at Bethany, on the occasion of the raising of Lazarus in the previous chapter, do we first hear that Jesus loved another person.

Read More

Letter from the Superior

Dear Members of the Fellowship of Saint John and other Friends,

When people first come to know our community, they are often surprised to discover that we Brothers – who gather to pray five times a day, every day – also go on retreat! “Don’t you already pray all day?” they ask. Of course it’s more complicated than that, which is one of the reasons that even monks need to set aside times for retreat. As a community, we take a yearly retreat every summer, as well as a retreat day each month. And individual Brothers have further times of retreat throughout the year.

Now I’ll confess that, depending on how I feel, I tend to use our annual retreat time for a number of different purposes. Sometimes it’s an occasion simply to catch up on my sleep or my reading. Other years I’ll use the retreat to spend significant periods of time in the garden. Yet what sustains me in the weeks or months that follow our retreat is not what I have accomplished, but who I have come to know.

I remember one evening after supper sitting in the Chapel. We had gathered to spend some time in prayer before the Sacrament and in the midst of our silence we could hear the chorus of birds singing as dusk fell. I remember being in awe as the song of the birds gave voice to the song of creation as it joined with us in praising the Creator.

I remember Sister Rosemary SLG inviting us one year to experiment with praying in the middle of the night. I got up at 2 am and made myself some hot chocolate. I wrapped myself in a blanket and sat in the rocker. I then had an incredible hour of prayer as I held before God all those who were in any danger at that very moment. I had the physical and emotional experience of literally standing between people and danger, of being their intercessor in the fullest meaning of that word.

I remember gathering one morning in the Chapel for the Eucharist and being overwhelmed by an awareness of the presence of Jesus in the gathered community; for “where two or three are gathered in my name, I am there among them” (Matt. 18:20). As I sat in my Brothers’ presence, I was deeply aware of the presence of Jesus, not simply in our midst, but embodied in my Brothers. 

Retreat times sustain me for weeks and months – and sometimes even years afterwards – because of the memory of the One I encountered. Our founder, Richard Meux Benson puts it this way: “in the retreat you want the real surrender of your soul with all the affections of the heart to God” (Instructions on the Religious Life, 2). Surrender to God rekindles our love for God and renews our experience of God’s love for us. This surrender is the heart of retreat. “We have meditated well if in our meditation we have loved much” (3). 

Retreat is a time to become lost in love with God. We hope this issue of Cowley will invite you to consider how God might be calling you to explore a time of retreat. Throughout these pages, Brothers share different approaches to retreat, as well as ideas for ways to weave retreat into our lives and daily routines. Whether we come away with God for a week or an hour, we know that when we truly look and listen for God, God will indeed reveal himself to us, for “none ever come unto God and are sent away empty. None come to God ever without receiving far more than they spend. Only come to Him, wait upon Him, look to Him, listen for Him, rejoice in Him. Put away everything else which can stand in the way of His being the simple joy of your heart” (9).

Br. James Koester

Yours in Christ,

Br. James Koester SSJE
Superior

The Lenten Discipline of Temptation – Br. Jim Woodrum

Play
Br. Jim Woodrum

Luke 4:1-13
Four days ago we finally began our Lenten pilgrimage after a long Epiphanytide.  For a solid eight weeks following the Epiphany we have celebrated all the ways Jesus was made manifest as the messiah to the world and have studied how these stories help us recognize how Jesus is made manifest in our midst today. Wednesday, we received our invitation to a holy Lent, had ashes placed on our foreheads to remind us of our mortality, and we are now at the first Sunday in Lent.  

As you might have gathered from our gospel lesson from Luke this morning, things have gotten really serious, very quickly! No sooner has Jesus come up from the waters of his baptism, he hears an affirmation of his identity from his Heavenly Father, and the Holy Spirit descends upon him.  In a sense, Jesus has an epiphany and is filled with the Holy Spirit, which then leads him into the harsh Judean desert where the gospel writer says that he was tempted by the devil for forty days.  Now, think about that for a moment:  even though only three of Satan’s challenges are recorded in the lesson, Luke is quite clear that he is tempted for forty days, all the while with no provision of food or sustenance. 

I do not know about you, but I am not encouraged by starting out on these forty days of Lent with a story of Jesus being subjected to mental and physical abuse by the devil!  This may explain why Lent is not at the top of my list of favorite Liturgical seasons, especially since my track record with temptation is pretty dismal. I know you may find that hard to believe, but I am the guy who gives up craft beer for Lent and by week two I have succumbed to the desert heat and am quenching my thirst with a cold, refreshing IPA straight from the devil’s hand!  In my frustration and disappointment with myself, I try to make myself feel better by thinking of something I can give up the next year where I might actually have success, like perhaps, asparagus.  Nothing banishes temptation quite like asparagus.  Yet to give up something that would not be challenging is to set out on an ‘adventure in missing the point’; the point being that temptation is a part of our everyday experience.  Saint Antony, one of the first of the desert monastics was recorded as saying:  “This is the great task of man, that he should hold his sin before the face of God, and count upon temptation until his last breath.”[i]  

Read More

Advent Observances: Eucharistic Prayer

The Eucharistic Prayer we will use on Sundays and Tuesdays in Advent is one of the new Eucharistic Prayers of the Episcopal Church. The language of the prayer is rooted in the wisdom language of Scripture, and while the identification of Jesus as the eternal Word and Wisdom of God is perhaps unfamiliar to us, it is evident in the New Testament and the writings of the Early Church. Note that the Memorial Acclamation (Dying, you destroyed our death…)and the concluding congregational sung doxology (Blessed are you now and forever. Amen.) are different than what we are used to. The words and music for them can be found in the service part of the bulletin.

Congratulations Brother David

Our Brother David Allen celebrates two significant anniversaries next week. On Wednesday, 19 December he celebrates his 89th birthday and on Friday, 21 December (the Feast of St. Thomas the Apostle) he celebrates the 60th anniversary of his ordination to the priesthood. Following the Eucharist on Sunday, 16 December there will be a reception in his honor. Please help to celebrate these milestones in Brother David’s life.

SSJE in The Way of Love

Presiding Bishop Curry recently invited the whole Church to take up what he calls “The Way of Love,” a series of practices that will help people to live Jesus-centered lives. “How can we together grow more deeply with Jesus Christ at the center of our lives,” Bishop Curry asks, “so we can bear witness to his way of love in and for the world?” His answer might not surprise Friends of SSJE. The answer is no less than keeping a Rule of Life!

“The deep roots of our Christian tradition may offer just such a path. For centuries, monastic communities have shaped their lives around rhythms and disciplines for following Jesus together. Such a pattern is known as a “Rule of Life.” . . .  The Way of Love: Practices for Jesus-Centered Life outlines a Rule for the Episcopal branch of the Jesus Movement.”

Turn. Learn. Pray. Worship. Bless. Go. Rest.

SSJE is delighted to make an appearance in the promotional video for “The Way of Love,” which you can watch below. We hope you’ll check out this wonderful program.

Upcoming Programs at the Monastery and Emery House

There is still time to register for the following programs being offered at the Monastery at Emery House:

  • Saturday, February 10: “Centering Prayer Workshop” with Br. Keith Nelson (9:00 am to 3:00 pm)
  • Saturday, April 21: “Completing God’s Work” (a workshop on Creativity) with Br. Mark Brown (9:00 am to 12:00 pm)
  • Tues-Sun, March 27-April 1: “Holy Week at the Monastery” (stay for part or all of the week)
  • Fri-Sun, March 23-25: “Palm Sunday Weekend at Emery House”
  • Tues-Sun, March 27-April 1: “Holy Week at Emery House”

Learn more and register for these programs here.

Peace

God’s peace is not achieved by the strong dominating the weak; such domination may bring a temporary end to conflict and war, but it will not bring about true peace. The kingdom of God is a peaceable kingdom, a transformed society in which each member is valued and treated with dignity. The weak and the strong live together in harmony, each caring for the other. There is no true peace without justice.

-Br. David Vryhof, SSJE

Read More and Comment >


The Gift of Peace

This offer and promise of Christ’s peace is here for the having. Receive it. Take it in as regularly and necessarily as you breathe. Breathe out fear; breathe in peace. Breathe out anger; breathe in peace. Breathe out sadness; breathe in peace.

Listen here>

Guest Preacher: The Reverend Gregory Basker

On Tuesday, 21 November we will welcome The Reverend Gregory Basker as our guest preacher at the 5:30 PM celebration of the Eucharist. Dr. Basker is a presbyter of the Church of South India and teaches theology and Scripture from a Tamil point of view at Tamilnadu Theological College, the Church of South India’s theological college in Madurai, India.