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Posts Tagged ‘Beauty’

Our Houses Have Simple Beauty – Br. James Koester

There is a line in our Rule of Life which, over the years, has become increasingly important to us. Indeed it has become one of our guiding principles, so much so that during the planning and actual renovation of the monastery, we referred to it repeatedly. However, having said that, I am not sure that when we wrote the Rule, we realized then that it was, or would become, so important and central to our lives. The line appears in the chapter on Hospitality and says quite simply, that our houses have simple beauty.[1]

As we know, there is a great deal of ugliness in the world, most if not all of it, if I can make a sweeping statement, created by humanity. The ugliness of the destruction of creation, as it is destroyed solely for our benefit, and the ugliness of the sin of poverty, racism, and war is all around us, and so places that are dedicated to simple beauty are a refuge for the heart, and mind, and soul.

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The Gospel of Creation – Br. Geoffrey Tristram

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Genesis 1:1-19 / Psalm 104:1-12

Br. Geoffrey Tristram

“Bless the Lord O my soul, O Lord my God, how excellent is your greatness!  You are clothed with majesty and splendor.  You wrap yourself with light as with a cloak.”

Those wonderful opening lines of today’s Psalm 104.  There is this amazing intimate relationship between God and creation.  God wraps himself with light as with a cloak.  So when we look at light we see something of God. And so with the cloud and the wind. They speak to us of God.

And this same relationship between God and creation is revealed in those opening verses of the beginning of the Book of Genesis.  God creates the dry land and the sea, light and darkness, vegetation, plants, trees, seeds, fruit, birds, fish, cattle.  And each time God saw that it was good.  God creates with love and tenderness and in God’s image.  The imprint of God’s very hand – the divine potter – is on everything he created.  It is very good.  This intimacy between creator and created is very important, because I know that the created world – the trees and flowers and birds, the sunshine – even the snow! – have the power to reveal God to us.

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Do You See This Woman? – Br. David Vryhof

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Br. David VryhofLuke 7:36-50

One day Jesus was invited to dine at the house of a Pharisee.  While they were at table, a woman “who was a sinner” entered the room with an alabaster jar of ointment.  She began to wash Jesus’ feet with her tears and dry them with her hair. Then she continued to kiss his feet as she poured the costly ointment over them.  We are not told who the woman was, or what had earned her the reputation of “a sinner,” or how she knew Jesus, or why she was weeping and anointing his feet.  The gospel writer records only her simple act of profound love and devotion.

The Pharisee objected mightily to this woman’s presence in his house.  He may have been irritated that she was distracting his guest and ruining his party.  But it’s more likely that he objected to her very presence.  He said to himself, “If this man were a prophet, he would have known who and what kind of woman this is who is touching him – that she is a sinner.”  For the Pharisee, that label had clear implications: it dictated how a righteous person would respond to her.  Certainly a teacher like Jesus should understand these important social norms. Not only would he not have let her touch him, he would not have interacted with her in any way.  To do so would compromise his own holiness. Read More

Small Beauties – Lydia Simmons

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Wisdom 7:7-14 & John 8:25-32

“All good things came to me along with her,
And in her hands uncounted wealth.
I rejoiced in them all, because wisdom leads them;
But I did not know that she was their mother.”

We all have an intuitive relationship with goodness, beauty, and truth. We come across things in the world that seem to reach out and grab us by the heart – perhaps a piece of art or music, a holy place, a human relationship, a piece of philosophy or Scripture that brings joy and light into our life. These things are good because they are from God, and we rejoice in them even before we know that God is their mother. We rejoice in them because they are like signposts, pointing the way back to Wisdom and helping us to desire and understand her.

But the things that lead us to God are not, themselves, God. All the truth and beauty we know in this life will inevitably disappoint us from time to time. We find that something beautiful no longer moves us, or that something true no longer convinces or reassures us, and we are left in the dark without any signposts to remind us that eternal Wisdom is out there. Read More

Sermons for the Beach: Contemplative Vision

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During the month of August, while the Chapel is closed, we are reposting sermons that we hope will inspire you to embrace play, silence, and recreation. The Chapel will reopen on Tuesday, August 30, 2016.

geoffrey 150xIt is so good to be back again, worshiping in this lovely place, after our time away of retreat and community discussions.  And it is so good to see you all again.  I do hope you have had a great summer – a time for rest and refreshment.

We had a wonderful retreat.  To spend those days amidst the natural beauty of Emery House was a great gift.  Certainly for me, and I know other Brothers, it was an occasion to deepen our contemplative vision.  In the Letter to the Hebrews which was read this morning, verse 14 says, “For here we have no abiding city, but we are looking for a city that is to come.”  And I think that’s really what the contemplative vision is all about.  It is about seeing with the eyes of faith; seeing that this life which we have is not the only reality.  When our contemplative vision grows, we see that the apparently ordinary things of life are shot through with the glory of God.  Spending time on retreat is a wonderful opportunity to really see again heaven breaking through – or as William Blake put it, “to see the world in a grain of sand, and to see heaven in a wild flower, hold infinity in the palm of your hands, and eternity in an hour.” Read More

A Message for Michael – Br. Nicholas Bartoli

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Matthew 8:1–4

When I was growing up I remember really liking my Uncle Michael – we used to call him Uncle Mickey. I didn’t get to see him very often, but I so looked forward to his visits. I only found out much later why he didn’t come to visit us more. He felt ashamed, he thought we wouldn’t want to see him, he believed he wasn’t worth seeing. You could say he felt “unclean.”

The notion of uncleanness  was a very important one in ancient Jewish culture, and it was applied to both food and people. Reasons for such laws included, for example, concerns over hygiene or the creation of a unique Jewish identity. Originally, they were never meant to indicate a person’s state of sin or social worth, but by the time of Jesus being pronounced “unclean” could put you in the category of moral failure and social outcast. Read More

Poetic Splendor in Color and Light: The Connick Foundation’s Orin E. Skinner Annual Lecture – Br. Curtis Almquist

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Dr. Charles Connick believed that stained glass is “the handmaiden of architecture.”  Quite.  We experience in this monastery chapel the extraordinary synergy of two devoted friends, who both were artisans and spiritual seekers: Ralph Adams Cram, the architect, and Charles J. Connick, the glassman.  You have to be prepared to take it all in.  As a visitor, you don’t simply walk into this monastery chapel from Memorial Drive.

First you must ascend, you must climb the steps.  Most of the cadence of monastic prayer is based on the Psalms, which are chanted in this monastery chapel from early morning, before the dawn, until the completion of the night before we sleep.  Many of the Psalms are Psalms of Ascent: about lifting one’s step, lifting one’s heart, lifting one’s hands, lifting one’s eyes to the holy place where God dwells.  You must reenact that posture of ascent to enter this chapel as you necessarily ascend the steps, but then you must do one more thing.  You cannot enter the chapel full stride.  As you will know, at the top of the steps, you are forced to turn before you enter the rear door of the chapel, the antechapel.  That turning is an experience of conversion.  The word “conversion,” as the word appears in the New Testament Greek, means just that: “to turn,” to turn in a new direction in response to God.  To enter this chapel you willingly ascend, and then you must change course – an act of conversion – before you cross over a threshold. Read More

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