Acts 28:16-20, 30-31
Psalm 11:4-8
John 21:20-25

I finished a novel the other day.  It was a really good one.  And now that it’s over I’m left a bit forlorn.  I would have loved this one to be a big multi-book series that could get turned into 8 or 9 movies.  But it’s not.  And it’s over now.  As we’ve been working our way through this final chapter of John I’ve had the same kind of feelings I have at the end of a book or a great film.  This longing for more, one more scene, one more chapter.

I think I must have been around 19 years old when I first heard someone talk about this passage at the end of John and it has stuck with me for 20 years.  “There are also many other things that Jesus did; if every one of them were written down, I suppose that the world itself could not contain the books that would be written.”

The good news of Jesus continues to be written on your hearts, in your lives among those you share life with.  You are the gospel of Christ.  And not in some gauzy, divine essence hidden in the deepest cavern of your soul.  The good news of Jesus is present and active in the tangible ways that you have been met by love.  In the ways that you have been rescued from sin and shame.  In the ways that love has defied the pattern of this world and transformed you by the renewing of your mind in Christ.  And it does keep going.

I can’t say that this feels like some glittering moment of grace.  Right now, I feel more like one of those bumbling disciples, just not quite getting it, struggling to make sense of where I am.  And it’s painful and confusing.  But I keep showing up.  ‘Twas grace that brought me safe thus far and grace will lead me home. Read More

“Br.Hugh of Lincoln

Keep awake therefore, for you do not know on what day your Lord is coming. […]Blessed is that slave whom his master will find at work when he arrives.

I sometimes wonder what it would be like if the gospel writers had left us a few more details about the delivery and reception of Jesus’ parables, and this morning’s lesson piques my curiosity. We know, for instance, that they would have been markedly longer than the forms in which they come to us and the form itself—the parable—would have elicited from the crowd objections and almost certainly some good, old-fashioned heckling.[1] While we know this would have occurred, we have no record of the content.

If you’re anything like me, you may be inclined to heckle Jesus over the parable he tells us today. In fact—and I’m outing myself here—these words of Jesus do not always come to me as “good news.” They may even bring up dread, anger, and even incredulity. And so I heckled Jesus this week. Read More

Br. Nicholas Bartoli

Luke 15.1-10

I was born and raised a Roman Catholic, or at least I’m pretty sure the plan was for me to be raised Roman Catholic. When I was still very young I turned away from the church, because parts of my early experience served to alienate me from all things religious or spiritual. But, one thing I do remember enjoying as a child was all the great stories.

Even the gospels considered on their own are filled will wonderful stories about the life and ministry of Jesus, and we know that Jesus himself used stories and parables as one of his primary ways of sharing the good news of God’s Kingdom. Maybe that’s because Jesus grew up formed by the rich tapestry of story and poetry in Hebrew scripture, and maybe it’s because these kinds of stories can offer us so many levels of meaning through which God speaks to us. Today, for example, we heard the parables of the Lost Sheep and the Lost Coin, stories about the joy of finding something lost, some small part of the whole that needs to be recovered and embraced. We’ll begin by looking at the inner meaning, the message leading us to our heart of hearts. Read More