Br. Jim WoodrumHebrews 11:1-3, 8-12, 23-28, 32-12:2; Psalm 37:28-36; Matthew 22:23-32

When we brothers were on pilgrimage to the UK a little over a year ago, we stayed at Keble College while in Oxford.  Among the prominent features of Keble College is its chapel.  It is not that there is anything outstanding in its architecture that makes it stand out, but rather, once you walk through the doors you are thrown into a sort of sensory overload, especially because all around the perimeter of the chapel are beautiful, multi-colored mosaics.  Once you get over the initial shock and begin to study the mosaics, you will note that most of the scenes portrayed are from the Old Testament. You see Noah and the Ark, Abraham and Isaac, Joseph, and others.  It may seem odd at first to experience a Christian chapel that predominantly features scenes from the Old Testament.  That is until you take a closer look and note that in each of the scenes there is a thinly veiled reference to Jesus Christ.

In the image of Noah we see a dove flying between the Ark and the rainbow, a symbol of the Holy Spirit hovering over both the waters of Creation and of the waters of Baptism.  Directly below that we see in the story of Abraham the priest Melchizadek offering bread and wine, the emblematic food of the Christian, the flesh and blood of Jesus Christ.[i]  And as you go around the chapel observing these mosaics you can see that Jesus is subtly there and that each story from the Old Testament is giving a knowing nod to the Word (sometimes referred to as the Wisdom of God), who the prologue of John’s gospel says was present in the beginning with God.  For the leaders of the Oxford Movement, the Old Testament is “one vast prophetic system, veiling, but full of the New Testament,” and, more specifically, “of the One whose presence is stored up within it.”[ii] Read More

Br. Curtis Almquist

Hebrews 11:1-3, 8-12, 23-28, 32-12:2

 Almighty God, in the midst of your people Israel you raised up many saints who through faith in your eternal covenant conquered kingdoms,did justice, and won strength out of weakness. Grant us to hold in glad remembrance their holy lives and fearless witness, that by your grace we may press on towards the goal for the prize of our heavenly calling;through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. Amen.

Studying history is both illuminating and humbling: illuminating because of the great benefit of perspective.  Life in-the-present can leave us quite myopic.  What’s going on in-the-now is very close to us – it’s “in our face” – so much so that we often can’t see around it.  Our perspective is inevitably blocked in some ways.  We could take, for example, the political campaign rhetoric during this past year.  Without the benefit of an historical perspective, the long view, we could simply react to various campaign statements just for their “face value,” but miss the wisdom gleaned from history.  Studying history can also be quite humbling.  It can put us in our place as individuals and as a nation in a very long line as life unfolds down through the centuries.  Today’s celebration of the Saints, the holy ones, of the Old Testament takes the long view, and that’s important for several reasons[i]: Read More