Home at Journey’s End – Br. Todd Blackham

Br. Todd Blackham

Isaiah 2:1-5
Romans 13:11-14
Matthew 24:36-44
Psalm 122

“Now is the moment to wake from sleep… the night is far gone, the day is near.”  I don’t know about you some days it’s easier to wake up than others.  Sometimes, when the alarm clock goes off I think, surely it can’t be that time already?  But there are other days when the anticipation of a new day makes it hard to get to sleep at all.  Eyes pop open even before it’s time and you’re filled with energy and enthusiasm.  I suppose it usually has something to do with what’s in front of me that makes the difference.

And this is just the time of year when the Church points us to what’s ahead.  “For salvation is nearer to us now than when we became believers.”  In this very first week of Advent, Jesus tells us to be ready for the unexpected day of the Lord.  He gives vivid examples.

In contrast to those who were blithely chasing the pleasant moments of life, Noah had his attention fixed to hear what God was calling him to prepare for. Read More

The Sign We Are Given – Br. Todd Blackham

Isaiah 7:1-9
Ps. 48
Matthew 11:20-24

I remember learning to drive before the advent of personal GPS devices.  I remember getting directions that involved both signs and physical landmarks to get from one place to another.  Take a left on River St. and go down until you see the mailbox with a yellow bird on it, then we’re three houses down on the right.  Nowadays, I’m more likely to just plug an address into my phone and let it guide me moment by moment down the comforting little blue line until I get to the red destination pin.  I hardly have to pay attention to my surrounding at all while the little voice just coaches me turn by turn.  But, in truth, I’ve become overly dependent on it.  I get a little anxious when I try to do without it because it forces me to put my trust in a different system of navigating that doesn’t offer real-time reassurance.  There is simply much more trust involved.  Trust that the signs will be there when I need them, trust that I will make the correct turns, and even trust that if I get off track, I’ll be able to get back on course and reach my destination.  Looking for signs and waiting for direction can be a precarious thing in the spiritual life.

Do you find yourself waiting on a sign from God?  Or, have you ever suddenly beheld a sign that arrested your attention and pointed you in a new direction.  God’s engagement with people often catches us unaware or seems absent when we want it most.  We may feel like things are going just fine until suddenly our circumstances change and we are gripped with uncertainty and fear.  Or, we may be so much on auto-pilot that we don’t realize when a new course of action is necessary.  Todays readings highlight both of these kinds of encounters with God and help to point us to Jesus who is an unfailing sign to return to the heart of God. Read More

Making Our Home in Jesus – Br. Todd Blackham

John 15:9-11

“Make yourself at home.”  It’s a nice thing to say to someone when they come over.  It’s meant to put them at ease.  It’s warm and inviting.  I remember being told this a lot when I was asked to house-sit for people.  And, as kind as it was.  I knew it was only conditional.  It was a temporary offer.  I was welcome to eat some food from the fridge or lay down on the couch but painting a bedroom or organizing the kitchen cabinets the way I wanted to was never part of the bargain.

When Jesus invites us to abide, to dwell, to make our home, he’s offering more than a conditional bargain.  He’s offering us eternity at home in God.

When John writes in his gospel that the “Word was made flesh” he chooses a word the resembles something more like “tented,” “tabernacled,” set up a temporary dwelling.  The Word was made flesh and camped out among us.  But, when Jesus talks about the relationship he’s offering with his disciples it has a more long-term, if not permanent ring.  Make your home with me. Read More

O Root of Jesse – Br. Geoffrey Tristram

Br. Geoffrey TristramIsaiah 11:1-3 / Matthew 1:1-17

Well, I managed to get through that long Gospel reading!  Why on earth did Matthew start his Gospel with a long, tedious list of names? Because for Matthew the gospel, (the Good News he was proclaiming), was entirely dependent on who Jesus is. The identity of Jesus is everything. And central to his identity is that he is a branch, stemming from the root of Jesse.  O root, O radix Jesse, as today’s Advent antiphon puts it.

Identity is central to the whole prophetic tradition in the Old Testament.  That tradition became more and more focused on the hope that one day, God would save his people by sending them a Savior – an anointed one—a Messiah.  But who would he be?  How will we know who it is?  People were always asking “who are you?”  “Where are you from?”  Well, Isaiah tells us in our reading today: “A shoot shall come out from the stump of Jesse, and a branch shall grow out of his roots.  The spirit of the Lord shall rest upon him….”  He will be the one.  We will recognize the Messiah when he comes, because he will come from the root of Jesse.

Well, the long genealogical list at the beginning of Matthew is pretty dreary – but the image of a tree, a family tree, is much more appealing to the imagination.  And that was certainly true for the medieval imagination.  So over the centuries, artists have created some of the most beautiful and imaginative trees to teach and to celebrate Jesus’ genealogical identity.  They are called Jesse Trees.  We see them in stained glass windows.  (The oldest piece of stained glass in England is the Jesse Tree at York Minster.)  We see them in stone casings (like the wonderful Jesse Tree greeting pilgrims at the entrance to the cathedral of St. James Santiago de Compostela.)  And we see them in illuminated manuscripts, such as the one you have before you.  It is taken from the famous Winchester Psalter from the 12th century. Read More