Conflict – Br. Jack Crowley

Mark 10:35-45

Jesus had twelve Disciples to manage. That means everyday he had twelve personalities to deal with, twelve opinions to listen to, twelve sets of emotional baggage to unpack, and twelve different backgrounds to understand. Jesus and his Disciples were not working remotely. This was not a Monday through Friday, nine to five gig. They were together all the time, and as our Gospel lesson today shows us, they did not always get along.

One might think that having the Son of God as the leader of the Disciples would prevent any conflict from arising. The Gospels show us that this is simply not the case. Despite witnessing Jesus’s miracles firsthand and having front row seats to his preaching, the Disciples still occasionally argued like children fighting over who gets to sit in the front seat of the car.

The drama of our Gospel lesson this morning centered on the Disciples James and John Zebedee. James and John were biological brothers. They were fishermen by trade who famously walked away from their job in the middle of a workday when they first called by Jesus.   Read More

The Prayer of Jesus – Br. Curtis Almquist

Luke 6:12-19

“Jesus went out to the mountain to pray; and he spent the night in prayer to God.”[i] Why? Why did Jesus pray through the night? It seems that in the morning Jesus had the clarity whom to call to be his 12 apostles. But why didn’t he just know that without praying? Why so many times in the Gospels do we read of Jesus’ setting off to pray to God whom he called “Father”?

In the Gospels, we read Jesus prays:

  • at his baptism[ii];
  • when he withdraws from the crowds[iii];
  • after healing people[iv];
  • when he is transfigured with God’s light while on the mountaintop[v];
  • before walking on water[vi];
  • after he learns of John the Baptist’s death[vii];
  • before he brings his dead friend, Lazarus, back to life[viii];
  • for his apostle, Peter, in the early days and at the end[ix].

We are told Jesus prays about food:

  • at meals[x];
  • before the miraculous feedings of the multitudes[xi];
  • before and after his “last supper” when he meets with his disciples[xii];

At the end of Jesus’ life, he prays:

  • three times in the Garden of Gethsemane before his crucifixion[xiii];
  • from the cross his agony and then his surrender[xiv];
  • after his resurrection when he breaks bread for his friends at Emmaus[xv].

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It is I; Do Not Be Afraid – Br. David Vryhof

John 6:1-21

Given our proximity to the ocean, we might imagine a vast body of water when we read in the Gospels about the Sea of Galilee.  But the Sea of Galilee is no ocean.  The Sea of Galilee is a lake, a large fresh-water lake in northern Israel/Palestine.  The lake is 33 miles long and 8 miles wide.  It is fed by the Jordan River which flows from north to south, and also by underground springs.

The Sea of Galilee is as dangerous as it is distinctive: distinctive because it is the lowest freshwater lake on earth – it’s surface almost 700 feet below sea level, with a beautiful shoreline, pristine drinking water, and a plentiful stock of fish.  Anddangerous because of its surprising and violent storms. From the Golan Heights in the east, fierce, cool winds meet up with the warm temperatures of the lake basin, sometimes creating the perfect storm.  Storms literally come out of the blue, even when the waters have been tranquil and the sky perfectly clear.

This must be the very thing that happened here with the disciples.  They had set off in their small fishing boat in seemingly tranquil waters, when suddenly a violent storm arose.  Their tiny boat was being battered by the wind and the waves, and there seemed to be no possibility of safely reaching the shore.  They were swamped by fear.  They had fished on this lake for a living.  They knew this water, they knew these storms, and they were terrified!

And you?  You probably know how it is to be sailing through life in radiant sunlight when swiftly and unexpectedly a storm arises and you suddenly find yourself swamped by mighty waves and tossed about by terrible winds.  Perhaps something tragic or frightening has happened to a family member or friend, or to you; maybe it’s a health issue, a financial disaster, an accident, some kind of assault, or some other unforeseen suffering.  There is so much to be afraid of in life, and our fears can seem so great when we feel so small.  Fear is no respecter of age, or gender, or social standing.  Fear may be the most common experience we share with all of humankind: the consuming, crippling, sometimes-irrational visitation of fear.  We can experience fear when we face impending danger, or pain, or evil, or confusion, or vulnerability, or embarrassment.  Whether the threat is real or imagined does not matter.  What does matter is our sense of powerlessness. We don’t feel we can stop or divert or control what threatens to swamp our lives and make us sink.  Whatever its source, our fear is real.

Jesus speaks a great deal about fear and anxiety, which is quite revealing.  He would have learned his lessons about fear from two sources, one being the Hebrew scriptures.  The scriptures which he would have known – what we call the “Old Testament” – are replete with messages about worry and fear.  We are told very plainly that we do not need to be afraid, and this is because of God’s promise and provision, God’s steadfast love and unfailing faithfulness.  Fear’s tight hold on us is loosened, the Bible assures us, when we put our trust in God.

“I sought the Lord, and he answered me,” the psalmist says, “and delivered me out of all my terror.” (Ps.34:4)

“The Lord is my light and my salvation, whom then shall I fear?” another psalmist declares. “The Lord is the strength of my life, of whom shall I be afraid? …. Though an army should encamp against me, yet my heart shall not be afraid; and though war should rise up against me, yet will I put my trust in him.” (Ps 27:1,3-4)

“Whenever I am afraid,” the psalmist says to God, “I will put my trust in you.” (Ps 56:3)

“God is our refuge and strength, a very present help in trouble,” writes another, “Therefore we will not fear, though the earth be moved, and though the mountains be toppled into the depths of the sea; though its waters rage and foam, and though the mountains tremble at its tumult…. The Lord of hosts is with us; the God of Jacob is our stronghold.” (Ps 46:1-3,11)

Jesus would have known these words, just as he would have known the words of the prophet Isaiah:

“But now, thus says the Lord, he who created you, O Jacob, he who formed you, O Israel:  Do not fear, for I have redeemed you; I have called you by name, you are mine.  When you pass through the waters, I will be with you; and through the rivers, they shall not overwhelm you; when you walk through fire you shall not be burned, and the flame shall not consume you.  For I am the Lord your God, the Holy One of Israel, your Savior.” (Isa 43:1-3)

Jesus would also have learned about fear from his own life.  I am not talking about the fear he observed in other people.  I am talking about his own personal fear, what he experienced.  We don’t know the specifics of what Jesus feared, but we do know that Jesus lived a fully human life, and therefore he must have been acquainted with fear, undoubtedly.  If you want to imagine what Jesus feared, use your own life as an example.  Of what have you been afraid?  If you went back in memory to your earliest childhood, then your adolescence, then coming into your twenties and beyond into adulthood, what has caused you to fear?

Were you afraid there would not be enough of something, or afraid there would be too much of something?  Were you afraid because you might be excluded from something, or afraid because you might be included in something?  Were you afraid because you might be asked to speak, or afraid because, when you spoke, no one would listen, or no one would understand?  Were you afraid because you might be left alone, or afraid because you would not be left alone?  Were you afraid because of too much work, or afraid because there was no work, or no meaningful work?  Were you afraid because you stood out, or afraid because you felt unnoticed, lost in the crowd, forgotten, invisible?  Were you afraid because you were bullied, or because you faced prejudice or persecution?  Were you ever so afraid that you feared for your life?  Or were you afraid because of your own temper?  Some of our fears are pathetic: tiny, tedious, embarrassing to even admit… and yet they are very real.  We suffer with our fears – which are the kinds of things Jesus must also have been afraid of, because these are the kind of fears that visit us in life.

When Jesus talks about not being afraid, he is not speaking clinically, nor is the source of his teaching primarily from external observation.  He is rather speaking from his own experience.  He is speaking about fear from the inside-out, autobiographically.  He had as much to be afraid of as you and I have.  And then, something slowly happened to Jesus.  Something shifted in Jesus in the nearly 20 years between when he was, at age 12, discussing theology with the elders in the Temple in Jerusalem, and when appeared before his cousin, John, to be baptized in the Jordan River.  These 20-some years are often called Jesus’ “hidden years,” and we are not told where Jesus was or what he was doing.  The scriptures are silent on this period of Jesus’ life.  I am certain he was making peace with the terms of his life, and that included facing his fears.

When Jesus finds his voice – at around age 30 – he speaks a great deal about fear, worry, and anxiety: he tells us that we need not be afraid, that we need not worry, that we need not be anxious.  Why is that?  Because of God’s powerful presence and provision; and because of God’s enduring faithfulness.  Jesus learned this.  In facing his own fears, he discovered he was not alone.

Going back to the Gospel lesson appointed for today: When a violent storm descends upon the disciples in the boat, Jesus appears to them.  The disciples are terrified.  Whatever we make of Jesus’ walking on the stormy water, we can see that he is not afraid.  Had he ever been afraid of storms on the Sea of Galilee?  I’m sure he had.  He had grown up in Nazareth, which is not far from the Sea of Galilee.  He knew storms, inside and out.  But he is no longer afraid of storms.  And he tells his disciples, he tells us, not to be afraid.  He isn’t scolding us; he is reassuring us not to be afraid, because we don’t need to be afraid.  He has come to know this, from the scriptures and from his own experience.  And he promises us his power, his provision, his presence to be with us always, to the end of the storm, and to the end of life.

If your life now is swamped with fear, or if you are afraid about an incoming storm in your life – and I presume that all of us are acquainted with fear – remember this: our fear is not an obstacle to God but rather an invitation from God to take Jesus at his word.  We need not be afraid.  Jesus will know every reason why we could be afraid because he’s been there.  He assures us not to be afraid, not to have anxiety, because he is with us: his presence, his power, his provision.  For us, fear can seem such an inmovable impediment.  But for God, our fear presents an opportunity to show forth God’s presence, and power, and provision; and an opportunity for us to learn to trust.  Our fear is God’s invitation, and Jesus will make good on his promise to be with us always.  There is so much of which we could be afraid in life, but Jesus assures us not to fear.

Saint Francis De Sales, a 17th century Bishop of Geneva, who lived during a very stormy time in history, left us with these words of assurance:

“Do not look forward in fear to the changes in life;
rather look to them with full hope that as they arise,
God, whose very own you are, will lead you safely through all things;
and when you cannot stand it, God will carry you in his arms.

“Do not fear what may happen tomorrow.
The same everlasting Father who cared for you today
will take care of you then and every day.

“He will either shield you from suffering,
or will give you unfailing strength to bear it.”

Jesus has the last word: “Do not fear, for I am with you, always.” (cf Mt 28:20)

Who Are You? – Br. James Koester

John 10: 31 – 42

Something significant, but not surprising, happens in the gospel today. Jesus has just told the crowds, that the Father and I are one.[1] The consequence of such a statement is outrage, and as we hear today, they took up stones again to stone him.[2] It is clearly not the first time Jesus has provoked such as response. The difference in this case, is that attitudes are hardening; divisions are more pronounced; and once again the threat of arrest is all too real, but he escaped from their hands.[3]

In many ways none of this should surprise us. From the very beginning, in a sense from the moment the Baptist testified that [Jesus] is the Son of God,[4] the division between those who believed, and those who did not, was bound to occur. What is new today, is that those divisions are becoming irreconcilable.

It is a question that lingers in the air, even today. Who are you?[5] is not a question asked only by those who encountered Jesus in the flesh, long ago. It is a question people ask today. It is a question which even we must ask. It is especially a question we must ask, as we stand on the threshold of Holy Week. Who are you? The answer, our answer, will determine what we see in the days ahead. Read More

To Question God, An Act of Faith – Br. Sean Glenn

Mark 7:24-30 

I don’t know about you, but this reading from Mark always strikes me as a bit of a scandal; to encounter Jesus with a very human prejudice on his lips. I’ve always found it a bit disturbing, especially to see a woman with a deep need coming to the incarnate Word of God, only to be met with an oddly human formation. Where’s the good news in this?—I often have to ask myself.

As I sat with this scandal of a reading for the past few days, I discerned three possible ways I think it might speak some good news to us, and might actually communicate some of the wideness of God’s mercy at play.

One of the things that speaks a word of good news is also one of the things that is most unsettling about this: we encounter a very human Jesus. A Jesus who has been formed by human communities with their own blind-spots, prejudices, and hatreds. Children verses dogs. Read More

A Prophet Like Moses – Br. David Vryhof

Deuteronomy 18:15-20 

Do you remember what it feels like to be at the threshold of something new in your life?

Imagine you are a student preparing to go off to college.  It’s new and exciting and full of possibilities – (what courses shall I take?  will I meet someone and fall in love?  will I make lifelong friends?  how will these years shape my future?)  You’re excited, but it’s also a bit daunting because you can’t fully imagine the challenges ahead (will I get along with my roommate?  will I experience heartbreak or disappointments?  will I fail?)

Or imagine a young couple awaiting the birth of their first child.  They’re thrilled, of course, but they’re also wondering, “What will it be like to be responsible for this tiny human being?  Will we be good parents?”  They anticipate the joys and possibilities of parenthood, but they also know it won’t be easy, and there is at least a possibility that it won’t as go well as they hope it will. Read More

So Shall We Be on That Day – Br. Keith Nelson

Matthew 9:36

When he saw the crowds, he had compassion for them because they were harassed and helpless, like…

Sheep without a shepherd.

Students without a teacher,

Children without a parent,

Eggs without a brooding mother,

Warriors without a commander,

Citizens without a leader,

Treasure without a guardian,

Inheritance without an heir.

Characters without an author,

Books without a reader, Read More

Relaxed Grip – Br. Luke Ditewig

John 8:51 – 59

“Are you greater than our father Abraham?” They were confused and upset. How could those who kept his word not see death? They clung to what they knew and could not hear or see something more. They clung so tightly to being Abraham’s children, that they missed really seeing Jesus.

What might you be clinging to so tightly such that it’s hard to recognize what is real? What is getting in the way between you and Jesus?

Perhaps it’s who we are or what we have: heritage, group-identity, connections. Perhaps it’s the people we love or who love us best, our meaningful relationships. Perhaps it’s comfort or privilege, standard of living, status or success. Perhaps it’s abilities, gifts, how we serve, what we do well—including for God.   Read More

Running and pausing with Jesus – Br. Todd Blackham

Depending on the Bible you have, todays gospel lesson may contain a couple of jarring section headings.  Mine says, “Coming Persecutions” and “Whom to fear.”  These instructions that Jesus gives as he sends out his first apostles are nothing short of harrowing.  They are not just warning of things that may happen, but rather foreknowledge of what will happen.  They are honest and direct ways of describing what it is that the apostles would very soon face.  James and John whom we remember today did indeed drink the cup of suffering for the gospel, and the faithful of every generation have found these warnings an apt description of their own experience when they were sent.

The followers of Christ in every age have had to contend with their own most pressing issues.  Loving God with all our heart, mind, soul, and strength and loving our neighbors as ourselves have never been without challenge.  There have often been warring political factions that demand utmost purity and allegiance.  Our skin, our bodies, our place in society, have often been the battlegrounds of human conflict.  Today they have their own particular slogans, banners, and champions. Read More

Do You Not Yet Understand (My Love for You)? – Br. Keith Nelson

Br. Keith Nelson

James 1:12-18
Mark 8:14-21

In my mid-twenties I worked for a non-profit agency in Boston’s Chinatown. The mission of the organization was to offer educational and social services to new Chinese immigrants and their families. Though generously supported by a base of donors, largely Chinese-American Christians, our budget was always tight. As the director of the organization’s English for Speakers of Other Languages program, I had just finished the long process of completing and submitting a complicated grant application that would give us access to some state funding. We did not receive the grant, and I was crest-fallen as I went into my regularly scheduled performance review with our executive director and founder – a charismatic, successful pillar of the community who had emigrated forty years ago. She worked her way through a long list of things she felt I could be doing differently. With each item, I began to feel a gathering energy of discouragement, like yeast molecules feeding on sugars of self-doubt and inadequacy. When she finally paused, I took a deep breath and asked – Was there anything she felt I was doing well? She let out an astonished laugh. “Everything! Your work is excellent!” I saw her face shift and her eyebrows furrow as she reasoned aloud that this must be a cultural difference. She took for granted that I knew what I was doing well. She had seen plenty of grant opportunities come and go, and had intended her feedback only to leaven my sense of resolve for the future by pinpointing areas for growth. After losing the grant, for which I felt personally responsible, I had needed a different kind of yeast: a balanced assessment that included reminders of my strengths, and her confidence in me, in order to make my dough rise. 

Do you still not perceive or understand? Are your hearts hardened? Do you have eyes and fail to see? Do you have ears, and fail to hear? And do you not remember?

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