Br. David VryhofLuke 12:1-7

At first glance, these words of Jesus seem contradictory.  ‘Do not fear human beings who can only kill the body,’ he says, ‘but fear God whose power extends through and beyond death.’  But having warned us to fear God, Jesus then reassures us of God’s lovingkindness towards us.  “Do not be afraid,” he says, “you are of more value (to God) than many sparrows.”  So which is it?  Are we to fear God, or not?

The Greek word that is translated “fear” in this passage is phobeó (fob-éh-o), which can mean “to fear” or “to dread,” but can also mean “to reverence” or “to hold in awe.”  It is this latter sense of reverencing or holding in awe that is the psalmist’s meaning when he says “The fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom” (Psalm 111:10).  It a state of being in which dread, veneration and wonder are mingled.   To “fear God” is to have a profound and humble reverence for God, who is sacred and mysterious, and who is far beyond our human understanding.

It is Moses’ fear before the burning bush, when with trembling hands he removed his sandals and “hid his face, because he was afraid to look at God” (Exodus 3:6). Read More