Zechariah 9:9-12;
Romans 7:15-25a;
Matthew 11:16-19; 25-30

Wisdom cries out in the street; in the squares she raises her voice. At the busiest corner she cries out; at the entrance of the city gates she speaks: ‘How long, O simple ones, will you love being simple?’ [i]

There are some who listen and follow, who find her dwelling and hold her fast. But there are many in the broad places of the world who ignore her. The marketplace is for many things, but not for wisdom. They don’t bother to look up from their tiny screens. Nimble fingers text and tweet faster than hearts can pause and feel.

‘We played the flute for them, but they didn’t dance. We mourned, but they didn’t wail.’ [ii]

With each comment thread, the bitter bickering shrinks the circle. Wisdom has not played by the rules.

He came to what was his own, and his own people did not accept him.[iii]

Jerusalem, Jerusalem! he cries, ‘How often have I desired to gather your children together, as a hen gathers her brood under wings, and you were not willing.’ [iv]

When the words of Wisdom finally find their target, the reaction is visceral. As one body united for the first time and the last, they cry: ‘CRUCIFY HIM! CRUCIFY HIM!’[v]

Yet – Wisdom is vindicated by her deeds.[vi]

Wisdom is vindicated by her deeds. Or, in Luke’s version, Wisdom is vindicated by her children.[vii]  In books such as Proverbs and Job, Sirach and Wisdom of Solomon, we encounter God’s Wisdom personified as a Woman of great gentleness and strength, offering food and drink, shelter and instruction, scorned by the masses but taking her stand nonetheless. In the book Sirach, the wise elder instructs a disciple: “Listen, my child, and take my advice, do not reject my counsel: put your feet into [Wisdom’s] fetters, and your neck into her collar; offer your shoulder to her burden, do not be impatient of her bonds… For in the end you will find rest in her and she will take the form of joy for you.”[viii] In the gospels of Matthew and John, we bear witness to a Spirit-led conversation between this multifaceted tradition of personified Wisdom and the early Christian experience of Jesus Christ. For us as for them, Wisdom is Jesus, the embodiment of all good things in Wisdom’s treasury and the incarnation of God, the source and ground of Wisdom. This Jesus is without doubt a Savior to be worshipped and an exemplar of how we are to act in the world. But he is also a Teacher of the heart, what today we are calling “inner work.” Read More

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Mt. 11:16-19

The Gospel Reading for today’s Eucharist is very brief. It seems to have little connection with that which precedes or follows it. But let’s see what it can tell us.

Today’s Gospel begins with the wistful remark, “To what will I compare this generation?” Then it is followed by an enigmatic reference to children playing the game in the marketplace, “weddings and funerals”. “We played the flute for you, and you did not dance; we wailed, and you did not mourn.” (v. 17)   In this we can see the ambiguous nature of the crowd Jesus had been speaking with.       Read More

But to what will I compare this generation? It is like children sitting in the marketplace and calling to one another: “We played the flute for you, and you did not dance; we wailed, and you did not mourn.” For John came neither eating nor drinking, and they say, ‘He has a demon’; the Son of Man came eating and drinking, and they say, ‘Look, a glutton and a drunkard.’
[Mat. 11:16-19]

“Damned if you do and damned if you don’t”, is how we might say it today. Jesus has encountered a cynicism and negativity in his people.  Dance to the flute?  No. Join in the dirge? No.  Feast? No.  Fast? No. Lots of “no”. Read More