Lectionary Year and Proper: The Fifteenth Sunday after Pentecost, Proper 24, Year A

Matthew 18:21-35

In today’s gospel lesson we hear what I experience as the most challenging of Jesus’ teachings: the admonition to forgive.  Not only to forgive just one transgression, but to forgive them all.  There may be a few of you who disagree with me thinking surely the most difficult teaching would be to love your enemies.  That would be fair.  Loving someone who wishes you harm and forgiving someone who has harmed you, especially harm that is irreversible, certainly burn with similar intensity.  We could agree that they are akin to one another, with varying degrees of intention and action being contrasting pieces of the puzzle.  Regardless of this quagmire, Jesus’ answer to Peter’s question ‘how often should I forgive,’ is that forgiveness is never discretionary.  Rather, forgiveness is Divine directive.

Jesus illustrates his point with a parable in which a king wishes to settle his accounts.  One of his servants who owes him ten thousand talents is unable to repay.  Begging the King for patience he promises that given some time, he will be able to pay in full.  Surprisingly, the king has pity and not only reneges on his order to sell the servant and his family, but pronounces his debts forgiven.  Completely.  I admit I do not know much about ancient currency, but ten thousand of anything sounds like no small amount.  I imagine it would be like having your mortgage forgiven when still owing over half with interest.  What would your reaction be if this happened to you?  I know that I would be incredibly thankful and filled with a sense of awe at the grace shown to me. Read More

Matthew 18:21-35

To know something is, in our imagination, an intellectual endeavor. To know something is to study it, to ascertain its dimensions, to come to conclusions about it, to test those conclusions, always refining your conclusions based on that testing, and to be able to articulate what you’ve learned to another. This is a valuable and useful approach, and it’s consistent with the general standard of knowledge that Western culture has adopted in the modern era.

But I find it lacks. I find it unsatisfying. It, perhaps, can sate my intellect, but I find that that’s not enough. As much as I’d sometimes like to be, I’m not merely an intellect. And as I learn to have less fealty to my intellect and more loyalty to my full humanity, I increasingly find this approach to knowledge to be somewhat sterile. Helpful, useful, yes, of course. But after this meal of the intellect, I often walk away feeling undernourished.

It is reassuring to find, then, that this is an incomplete understanding of the idea of knowledge in Christianity. St. Ephrem, a fourth century Syrian deacon and hymn writer, put forth the idea that there were three ways to attempt to know something.1 The first, the crudest, the most rudimentary, is a pursuit of knowledge that seeks to dominate the subject that is to be known. This is knowledge merely as a means to an end. There is nothing inherently wrong with coming to know something purely in service of some other goal, but it is no full depiction of Christian knowledge Read More

Ecclesiasticus 27: 30-28: 7
Psalm 103” 8-13
Romans 14: 5-12
Matthew 18: 21-35

In his recent excellent treatise on contemplative prayer, BECOMING CHIRST, Brian C. Taylor gives this description of redemptive living Jesus frequently referred to as the Kingdom of God or the Kingdom of Heaven. Read More