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Posts Tagged ‘Mission’

Why Church Matters, Right Now – Lisa Kimball

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Acts 8:26-40
Psalm 20
John 14:15-21

Lisa Kimball, Lifelong Learning at Virginia Theological Seminary

The Spirit spoke, Philip ran, the Eunuch asked, teaching began, water appeared, the chariot halted, baptism happened, lives were changed.

In my experience, conversion and discipleship are rarely this efficient but the elements, the rhythm, the signs are familiar. I recognize the irreducible miracle of spiritual mentoring and good teaching because I have received it. Faithful women and men have come alongside my messy, ordinary life at just the right moment. When God shows up between a mentor and a seeker, the sum is infinitely greater than the parts and everyone is changed forever. Who was your Philip? Who is your Philip today? 

Is it any wonder that the account of the Ethiopian Eunuch is a template for the ancient Christian discipleship process, what the church calls “the catechumenate?” The word “catechumen” is from Biblical Greek, meaning “one who sounds out something.” The catechumenate is a supportive and encouraging environment in which an inquirer makes a series of informed decisions to journey through to Christian initiation. We see here, in this passage from Acts, the dynamic interaction between community, scripture, and sacrament that produces a living ecosystem in which transformation and growth occur. 

When the people of God are listening, paying disciplined attention to the Lectionary, bringing their deepest longings into Liturgy and looking out for signs of Life, then the Holy Spirit calls seekers to appear, teachers to emerge, Christians are formed, and vocations are discerned. For seekers to turn and bring their longings toward the Church, the Church must be intentionally showing and sharing the Gospel with the world. If the church is to be a sign of Life — a magnet for the God-given longing in all people to reconcile with God and with one another — then the Church must speak its abundant life in the terms of the times.  As Anglicans, we are at our best when we engage the signs of our times with the signs of eternal life. 

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Missionary Season – Br. David Allen

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"Br.1 John 3:11-18 / John 1:43-51

As we move from the Festal Season of Christmas into what is sometimes called Ordinary Time what ought we to think?

When I was a newly confirmed Episcopalian in 1942, I learned that the season we are about to enter can be called the Missionary Season.  An example of Mission activity is Andrew taking his brother Peter to meet Jesus.

Today’s Gospel gives us the example of Philip finding Nathanael and telling him about Jesus.  Philip first told Nathanael, “We have found him about whom Moses in the law and also the prophets wrote, Jesus son of Joseph from Nazareth.” Nathanael’s reply was not very encouraging, “can anything good come out of Nazareth?” Philip went on to say to him, “Come and see.” What happened then was very encouraging, to say the least.  Jesus showed himself a good judge of Character.  When Jesus told Nathanael he had seen him under a fig tree, there was a further revelation. Read More

Be a Miracle Worker! – Jonathan Maury

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Br. Jonathan MauryMatthew 10:7-15

“Go forth with this message,” says Jesus, “the kingdom of heaven has come near.”  Observing Hebrew reticence in speaking the name of God, these disciples are to speak of the longed-for mercy, justice and compassion of God’s already present and gracious reign.  In their own persons, the twelve are to do as Jesus has already done: “Cure the sick, raise the dead, cleanse the lepers, cast out demons.”

In taking up this mission with Jesus, the twelve are called to radical dependence on the provision of God.

And so are you and I.  Read More

I Will With God’s Help – Br. Jim Woodrum

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Br. Jim WoodrumJonah 3:1-10

If God were to appear to you in a dream and tell you to travel to New York and walk through the center of Manhattan pronouncing God’s judgment and impending destruction of that city, how would you respond?  I suspect many of us would wake up and think, wow, that was a really strange dream and perhaps share it with friends for a laugh over a coffee or lunch break.  If we felt particularly disturbed by the dream, we might call our therapist or spiritual director to help process the feelings and emotions the dream conjured.  Somehow I suspect most if not all of us would eventually shrug it off and forget about it.  But what if this dream were to reoccur persistently?

In this evening’s Old Testament lesson we hear a portion of a comical story about Jonah who receives this very message from God.  This short book is only four chapters long start to finish and the introduction to Jonah in the New Oxford Annotated Bible states that he is never even called a prophet in the text.[i]  To add insult to injury, the book of Jonah is more about God’s dealings with the ‘prophet’ himself than with the recipients of Jonah’s message, therefore making Jonah the ‘circus clown’ of all the prophets.  His day starts out by getting a daunting assignment from God:  go to Nineveh, the capitol city of the hated and oppressive Assyrian Empire, and pronounce God’s judgment on them.  I don’t think there is a single one of us who blame Jonah for his response.  Jonah runs away and we shake our heads at him intuiting that this is only going to get worse. Read More

Marks of Love – Robert Heaney

image1-2As Episcopalians we talk about five “Marks of Mission.” To think of these as five marks of love seems to me to be a helpful reframing. God is love. And whatever mission is or is not, it is about the God of love. Indeed, we might say that mission is who God is and what God does. Christians think of God, in God’s being, as burning “with an unchecked Flame, red hot, incendiary. God does not have Love any more than He has Knowledge or Power: He just is these things.” God is love. Love without object or act (Katherine Sonderegger, Systematic Theology Volume 1, 489, 485).

God is love. Too often we skim over such words as a rock skitting across water thrown from a boat to a shore. We touch the truth for a passing moment. We fail to plumb the depths. If, by the power of Christ’s Spirit, we could begin to experience and encounter the depths of divine love we would avoid much of the misunderstanding and malpractice that passes for mission in the Church. God is love. Read More

Thanksgiving for the Ministry of Women – Br. David Allen

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DavidA_2008_031 We heard in today’s Gospel that Jesus was setting out on one of his preaching tours. At first thought today’s Gospel may appear to be just another narrative about one of Jesus’ walkabout tours for ministry. The purpose of those tours was to proclaim the Good News of the Kingdom of God, and to bring that message to the towns and villages of the region of Galilee. Read More

Love's Concern – Br. David Vryhof

davidv150x150Imagine the range of emotions parents might feel when sending their daughter off to college for the first time, or saying good-bye to a son who is moving across the country to begin a new job.

They have loved their children as best they could. They have trained them and nurtured them, disciplined them and encouraged them. They have tried to give them self-confidence and an appreciation of their unique gifts and abilities. They have tried to shape their character and mold their values. They’ve tried to inspire in them a vision of what life can be, and of what they can offer to the world. And now they are sending off these children of theirs, releasing them so that they can find their own way of being and loving in the world. As parents, they are aware of the challenges, the temptations, even the dangers, that will confront their children in these new settings. And so they pray for God’s protection, and for wisdom as they make choices, and for the guidance of the Holy Spirit as they begin this new phase in their life’s journey. Read More

Mystical and Apostolic – Br. Mark Brown

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Mark-Brown-SSJE-2010-300x299I’ve been thinking a lot lately about a phrase from our Rule of Life that refers to the “mystical and apostolic aspects of our vocation”.   The “mystical and apostolic”: it’s a way of encapsulating one of the polarities or we might say complementarities of the Christian life. The mystical and apostolic—or we could say the contemplative and the active—or prayer and service.  The SSJE has both in its DNA—as do many other religious orders.

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Ready! Set! Go! – Br. James Koester

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Br. James Koester

If you are anything like me, and I have been around long enough to know that none of you are like me; but I have also been around long enough to know that you are all like me. You all have your own interior cycles of feasts and fasts. Sometimes this interior cycle is connected to the calendar. Sometimes it is even connected to the liturgical cycle of the church. But sometimes it is connected to your gut. You find yourself thinking or feeling or pondering something and you don’t know why or where it has come from and then, days or weeks later you understand. Right, you think. That’s where it is coming from.

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