Acts 2:42-47; Psalm 23; 1 Peter 2:19-25; John 10:1-10

Many of you know that I have a special affinity for angels.  These mysterious figures show up throughout scripture and fill the depths of my imagination with stories of their continual worship in heaven, especially as described in the Revelation to John.  If I had to say there was a runner-up for the affections of my heart, it would probably be shepherds.  This is in part because they were the first to hear the news of Jesus’ birth, announced to them by a multitude of angels.  The main job of these country-dwellers was for the husbandry and protection of flocks of sheep placed in their care.

When I first began to pray with our Collect for this morning the phrase ‘good shepherd of your people’ caught my attention.  I began to think back throughout my life to people who had been shepherds to me, and thank goodness there have been many.  I recall the youth program at my elementary school that occurred every summer sponsored by our local Department of Parks and Recreation.  While parents were working, neighborhood kids could ride their bike up to the school where young adults employed by the Parks and Rec would be on hand to facilitate games, art, physical fitness, and field trips.  Being an only child experiencing the ups and downs of family life that was not always happy, I craved and needed special attention.  There were two or three young adults during those summers who recognized that need and would play board games with me when no one else showed any interest.  They shepherded me when I, in a way, was a lost sheep, bullied by other kids and isolated because I was not popular. When I received the attention I so desperately needed from these councilors I felt happy, content, and most importantly, safe.  Perhaps this is what inspired me to ask my parents one Christmas if I could have an older brother.  I wanted someone who cared for me, looked out for me, and who had walked the very path I had walked earlier in his life; someone who could guide, affirm, and encourage me when I felt especially alone and vulnerable.  I think this is as true for the 49-year old Jim as it was for the 9-year old Jim. Read More

Br. James Koester

Acts 2: 42 – 47
Psalm 23
1 Peter 2: 19 – 25
John 10: 1 – 10

Finally the phone call came, and I went down to the post office to pick up my parcel. On this particular day the woman ahead of me in the line was picking up her package of bees. I’d seen them as I came into the post office. They were sitting, by themselves, on the loading dock. The postal workers won’t let them inside the building. They don’t like having to deliver bees, but the postal regulations require them to do so. My package on the other hand was sitting in the corner, near the counter. I knew it was mine because I could hear the goslings inside, honking away.

As incredible as it seems my four goslings had hatched on a Monday. They had been sexed, packed and shipped from Oklahoma before the end of that day, and there I was, picking them up in West Newbury on Wednesday. They came in a box about the size of a clementine orange box with a bit of straw and a heat pad. I put them in the car and drove them home, talking to them the whole way. When I got them home, I carefully opened the box and picked them up one at a time as I gave them something to drink. Having done that I was able to install them in their goose coop. Read More

Br. James Koester

Feast of Saint Edward the Confessor and Requiem for Brother John Goldring SSJE

Wisdom 3: 1-6
Psalm 23
1 John 3: 1-2
John 20: 1-9

I first met John in the fall of 1981. I was at the Mission House in Bracebridge with a group of my fellow divinity students from Trinity College, Toronto for our annual fall retreat. I remember a number of things about that weekend. I remember that it was a wonderful fall weekend, much like the last several days have been here. Father Dalby, whom some of our will remember, was our retreat leader. And John preached at the Sunday Eucharist.

Now I don’t remember what John said in his homily, but I do remember that I, like my other classmates, was stunned by its simplicity, its brevity and its depth.Little did I know at the time, that John’s sermons would become a regular and important part of my spiritual life.  Nor would I have ever guessed on that Sunday in the chapel at Brace bridge, that I would be standing here, 35 years later, presiding at his funeral as his brother and Superior. Read More

Br. David Vryhof

I Peter 5:1-4
Psalm 23
John 21:15-17

The Christian life is a life of transformation.  The call to follow Christ is a call to a lifelong process of conversion.  It requires us to let go of our former identities – built on our gifts, our achievements, and our social standing – in order to embrace a new identity in Christ.  It asks us to set aside our selfish goals and pursuits to take on a new set of priorities and values.  It invites us to become changed people: people whose lives are characterized by love, joy, peace, patience, kindness and humility.  It summons us to treat every person we meet with dignity and respect, seeing that they too are made in the image of God.  “If anyone is in Christ,” writes St. Paul, “there is a new creation: everything old has passed away; see, there is a new creation!” (II Cor. 5:17) Read More

Br. James Koester

Feast of St. Timothy and St. Titus, Companions of St. Paul

Isaiah 52: 7-10
Psalm 23
Mark 16: 15-20

I had one of those aha moments on Sunday night which keeps reverberating through me. I had flown up from Boston earlier in the day and was staying with my sister and her family. That night my brother and his family came for dinner. The nine of us sat around the dining room table that had once been in my parents’ dining room. We laughed a lot. We caught up on each other’s news. We talked about the upcoming wedding of one of my nephews. We told stories. We exchanged news about my other siblings and their families, who weren’t at dinner that night. And we laughed some more. It was a great evening. Everyone went home or up to bed that night knowing something important had happened.

What happened on Sunday over good food, good wine and good company was that my family was re-membered. The disparate parts of the body were brought together and reconnected through food, wine and story. We reminded ourselves who we are, not as individuals, but as a family. We reminded ourselves who we belonged to and from where we had come. Read More

Br. Mark BrownActs 4:8-13 / Psalm 23 / 1 Peter 5:1-4 / Matthew 16:13-19

Today we celebrate the Confession of St. Peter.  They’re at Caesarea Philippi, a beautiful, rugged place of streams and waterfalls north of the Galilee in the Golan Heights, an area of Syria now controlled by Israel.  The splendid Roman city is gone; the many temples and shrines to pagan gods built into the face of a great rock cliff are gone—a couple of small niches remain.  It was perhaps directly facing these shrines with their statues that Jesus may have said something like, “That is Pan and that is Aphrodite.  But who do you say that I am?” “You are the Anointed, the Messiah, the Christ; the Son of the living God.”  You are Son of the living God, not a god carved in stone—says Peter.  The shrines and temples were built on the face of the rock cliff; the church would be built on the faith of a human “rock”, that is, Petros, Peter—as Simon came to be known. Read More

This homily was preached at St. Barnabas’ Anglican Church, Ottawa

1 Samuel 16:1-13; Psalm 23; Ephesians 5: 8-14; John 9: 1-41

Back in the days when my time was more my own, I used to watch a fair amount of television. My favourite shows came on in the evenings; things like Falcon Crest, Dynasty and Dallas. You might remember them. Each week I was glued for hours on end to my television as episode after episode played out. One of the shows, Falcon Crest, I think, a character named ‘Father Bob’ turned up every so often to minister to the needs of the family. When he would come on, I would wonder to myself what it would be like to minister to the fabulously rich, the enormously powerful and the incredibly beautiful.

Perhaps it is because of God’s wry sense of humour that that young twenty some year old priest who wondered about ministering to the fabulously rich, the enormously powerful and the incredibly beautiful now stands before you as one who has taken the vows of poverty, celibacy and obedience. Wealth, power and beauty, or “Sex, Money and Power” as the title of one book puts it, are not quite my stock and trade. Read More