Sabbath Joy – Br. James Koester

Matthew 12: 1-8

My mother grew up, at least in the summers, with her Methodist minister grandfather who was quite a strict Sabbatarian. As a grown woman she remembered the Sundays of her childhood as full of rules, regulations, and restrictions. She could not swim unless it was over 100 degrees. She was not allowed to call on her friends but had to sit quietly with her younger sister reading. Sunday dinner, which had been cooked the day before and in spite of being kept warm in the oven, was cold, overcooked and tasteless. To me, and obviously to her as she spoke of it, it sounded dreadful.

Today’s gospel pulls us in to yet another confrontation between Jesus and a group of Pharisees. This time the argument is about sabbath keeping. It’s an argument I think my mother would understand.

It’s easy for us read this passage and once again to vilify the Pharisees, setting them up over and against Jesus, and always on the loosing side. Rather than doing that, let’s dig around and see what we can discover about the nature of the sabbath, and the point Jesus might have been trying to assert.

It’s first important to remember that sabbath is of the very nature of God. God is a God who creates, redeems, and rests. Read More

Keeping the Sabbath Wholly – Br. Curtis Almquist

Br. Curtis AlmquistDeuteronomy 5:12-15
Mark 2:23-3:6

For Jesus, Saturday – not Sunday – was the most important day of the week. Saturday, not because of shopping, or afternoon barbeques, or baseball games, or getting bills paid and the laundry done, but because Saturday was the sabbath, the most important day of the week.  Jesus was formed in the observance of the Ten Commandments.  Of all the Commandments, the longest explanation is given to the fourth commandment: “Remember the sabbath day, and keep it holy.”[i] You are probably quite clear about the commandment not to commit murder, and not to steal, and not to take the Lord’s name in vain, but what about remembering the sabbath day and keeping it holy?[ii]  Is that a little fuzzy for you?  If so, what happened, because you’re not alone?  For many people, several things have colluded to compromise the observance of sabbath.

For one, there’s the Church’s deference to Sunday.  Sunday is the day of resurrection.  Every Sunday is a little Easter.  By the Middle Ages, most Christians had transferred sabbath observance from Saturday to Sunday, i.e., keeping Sunday holy.  Sunday, for most Christians, became the new sabbath.  As a young boy, I remember the preparation for Sunday, our sabbath day, included the ritual Saturday night bath. Sunday morning I put on my very best clothes for church. My father taught me how to tie a necktie because because of church attire on Sunday.  And that’s pretty much what we as a family did on Sundays: we went to church Sunday morning and Sunday evening, and we were together as a family all Sunday.  I didn’t play with my neighborhood buddies, I didn’t watch TV, I didn’t make a lot of noise. There were no school activities on Sunday. There were “Blue Laws” which kept the stores shut: no shopping on Sundays, which also allowed store employees to do the very thing we were doing on Sunday: having a day of rest.[iii] Read More

Come Away and Rest – Br. Jim Woodrum

Br. Jim WoodrumMark 6:30-34

A friend of mine recently e-mailed me a maxim which read, ‘Work tip:  Stand up.  Stretch. Take a walk. Go to the airport.  Get on an airplane.  Never return.’  I sometimes wonder if this is what Jesus and his disciples felt like in their own ministry.  When you read the gospel of Mark, one thing you will notice straight away is the fevered pace with which Jesus and his disciples move in their ministry.  After Jesus is baptized, Mark writes that the Spirit immediately drives Jesus into the desert to be tempted by Satan.  He then begins his ministry, chooses his disciples, heals a man with an unclean spirit, heals Simon’s mother-in-law and then others who catch wind of Jesus power.  He then begins a preaching tour through Galilee and cleanses a leper he encounters along the way.  And this is just the first chapter and in as little as 870 words!

We’re now in chapter six and we read that Jesus’ disciples have been out on their own preaching, teaching, healing, and casting out demons.  They have met up with Jesus again and you can sense their child-like excitement as they begin to recount how they had put to use all that He had been teaching them.  With all this commotion around them they had not even had time to attend to their own needs of sustenance and rest.  We then hear Jesus tell them, ‘Come away to a deserted place all by yourselves and rest a while.”  The sigh of relief is palpable as we read that they got in a boat and set sail for the other side.  Can you identity with Jesus and the disciples?  Have you ever had one of those days or even weeks that just doesn’t seem to stop? Read More