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Posts Tagged ‘salvation’

Leftover Pizza and Dirty Towels – Br. Keith Nelson

Br. Keith NelsonMatthew 9: 9-13

Jesus saves.

I believe that to be true. Probably, so do you. We believe that Jesus saves us from sin – our own and the sins of the whole world. Jesus saves us from death: by his Incarnation, by his freely given human life, and by his freely chosen death on the cross. Jesus saves us from the worst in ourselves: from our daily blindness, ignorance, resentment and failure to love.  Jesus saves. For us, that is good news.

But just imagine that somewhere there is a person who doesn’t believe he is in need of saving. The message that “Jesus saves” rings hollow in his ears. In fact, he and his many friends hear this proposition and yawn, or chuckle, or roll their eyes. The offer of a Savior is not what they need.

Jesus heals.

I believe that, also, to be true. Probably, so do you. We believe that Jesus, our Savior, was also a Healer at heart, spending himself, spending his life bending down and reaching out to touch the leper, the blind, the deaf, the lame, the bleeding and broken and forsaken of the world. In healing bodies, he healed hearts and souls, and lives even now to do the same. Jesus heals. For us, that is good news. Read More

Peace, Comfort, Hope – Br. James Koester

Br. James KoesterIsaiah 40: 1 – 11
Psalm 85: 1 – 2, 8 – 13
2 Peter 3: 8 – 15a
Mark 1: 1 – 8

Each year I get a little crankier and a little more annoyed by Christmas.

Now, don’t get me wrong, before you write me off as some kind of a monastic Scrooge, let me explain what I mean.

If truth be told, I actually love Christmas. I love the lights, and the tinsel, and the tree. I love the decorations, and the carols, and the crèche, and the baking, (perhaps especially the baking!). I love Christmas. What makes me cranky, and annoyed, is that what many people really just want are the lights, and the tinsel, and the tree. What many people really just want are the decorations, and the carols, and the crèche, and the baking. What many people really just want is the baby and the celebration. What many people don’t want is a saviour. But isn’t that the whole point of Christmas? And you are to name him Jesus, for he will save his people from their sins.[1]

For many, Christmas is about a cute, pudgy, sweet smelling baby, nestled in a bed of clean straw, in a romantically quaint, clean, rustic looking barn, amidst softly falling snow, much as we had yesterday. What they don’t want, is a saviour. And they don’t want a saviour, because that would suggest that we need saving. That would suggest that life isn’t all that we so often pretend it to be. And who wants to admit that life, especially my life, is not perfect, or that I can’t fix it? Read More

Strive! – Br. Keith Nelson

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Br. Keith Nelson

Luke 13:22-30

 I have been captivated recently by the icons of Maxim Sheshukov, a Russian iconographer who works in a traditional style but whose icons often depict themes or events from Scripture rarely depicted in icons – Zacchaeus in the sycamore tree, or Judas accepting the bag of silver, or the slaying of Abel by Cain, for instance. One icon that has been much fodder for my prayer depicts Christ, his figure almost whimsically tall and slender and slightly bent at the shoulders, standing before an equally tall, dark, and very narrow door. The wooden panel on which the icon is painted is tall and narrow, and is itself highly suggestive of a door. The background is a simple, quiet yellow ochre, the color of sand or wheat. Christ’s right hand – or more precisely, his outstretched, right pointer finger, seems to rest on the face of the door, pointing toward it, perhaps giving it the gentlest tap imaginable. His left hand holds a thin, narrow scroll, its words concealed from view.[i] Read More

Coming Home – Br. Geoffrey Tristram

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Br. Geoffrey Tristram

Exodus 3:7-12
Psalm 84:1-6
Luke 15:11-24

This evening is the second in our series of sermons on the theme of ‘Salvation Revisited.’  We are exploring the theme of salvation, which is central to the faith of the Church, and to the season of Advent, when we are promised a ‘Savior.’

Next week the theme will be ‘The sacred and Imperishable Proclamation’ and the final week’s theme will be ‘Salvation – from What, to What?’

My theme today is ‘Coming Home.’

When I was a teenager I rarely went to church.  I was confirmed at 12, at school.  Almost everyone in my class was confirmed – mainly so as not to let the house down!  But for me, it was a kind of ‘passing out parade.’  No more church.  I was interested in religious ideas, but thought Christianity rather facile.  I preferred the more exotic Eastern forms of religious expression – far more interesting ways of trying to make contact with the divine.  But one day, in my late teens, on one of my rare visits to church, I heard a Gospel which kind of stopped me in my tracks.  It was the Gospel we heard read today: the parable of the Prodigal Son.  What really moved me, was this image of the Father.  Day after day, his father had been longing for his son – missing him, longing for him to come home.  Scanning the horizon.  Please, my son, come home.  And then, one day, he sees him, way in the distance.  He is so overjoyed that he runs – runs out to meet him, and welcome him home. Read More

Salvation Revisited: 2015 Advent Preaching Series

2015-Adventseries-badgeSalvation Revisited: An Advent Preaching Series

During this season of Advent, at the 5:30 pm Eucharist on Tuesdays, we will be exploring the theme of ‘salvation.’  Salvation is a theme that is central to Christian faith and particularly appropriate during this season, as we await the coming of our Savior.  Over the course of these four Tuesdays, Brothers will be sharing their reflections on what salvation means and how we might receive or experience it in our daily lives.

Dec 1, 2015 – “See, I am Making All Things New” – Br. Curtis Almquist

Dec 8, 2015  – “Coming Home” – Br. Geoffrey Tristram

Dec 15, 2015 – “The Sacred & Imperishable Proclamation” – Br. Mark Brown

Dec 22, 2015 – “Salvation: From What, To What?” – Br. David Vryhof

The Judgment of Love – Br. Curtis Almquist

curtis4This evening is the first of a three-part Advent sermon series we have entitled “Ero Cras,” which is a Latin acrostic translated “Tomorrow, I [that is, Jesus Christ] will be there [that is, there for you].”[i]  Following the liturgy on these three Tuesday evenings we invite all of you in the congregation to join us for a soup supper, and with opportunity to ask questions of the evening’s preacher.  These next two Tuesdays in Advent, the preacher’s focus will be “Hope” and then, “Desire and Longing.”  This evening my focus is “Judgment and Salvation.” Read More

End Times – Br. Curtis Almquist

curtis4Luke 21:5-9

For several reasons, we are in a bit of a time warp listening here to what Jesus said.  Jesus would have spoken these words in about year 30 c.e., making his prediction about the temple’s impending destruction.  It did happen, but not until forty years later, in 70 c.e., when the Roman Empire’s occupation forces did completely destroy the temple.[i]  Not one stone was left upon another, just as Jesus predicted.  Luke is writing his Gospel account 15 years later than that, in about year 85 c.e.  Luke is quoting Jesus based on what Luke has been told by eyewitnesses to Jesus, plus what other people have remembered Jesus’ saying.  The temple was destroyed; there were indeed wars and insurrections, which increasingly compromised the pax Romana; and in the midst of these horrific experiences, Luke had his own experience of Jesus’ good news: how who Jesus claimed to be and what he promised to do was all true.  Luke was a believer. Read More

Today salvation has come! – Br. David Vryhof

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davidv150x150If any of you were present at the Red Sox’ victory parade in Boston yesterday, you may have some sympathy for Zaccheus, the undersized tax collector who scrambled up a tree to catch a glimpse of a local celebrity as he passed by.  It was a bold move, one which would have invited the ridicule of others, but Zaccheus, I think, was used to the ridicule of others.  As a chief tax collector, Zaccheus was implicated in the corrupt and oppressive rule of the Romans over the Jews.  He was a man on the margins of society, despised by his fellow-Jews and used by the Romans.  But some strong desire – perhaps the fruit of his own unhappiness – compels him to look for Jesus, about whom he had undoubtedly heard so much. He climbs a tree to see Jesus, but is surprised when Jesus sees him, and invites him to come down and share a meal with him, an act of generosity that upsets the crowd.  “All that saw it began to grumble, and said, ‘he has gone to be the guest of one who is a sinner’” (vs.7).  The result of the meeting, however, is a dramatic conversion, in which Zaccheus promises to give half of his worldly goods to the poor, and to make restitution to all those whom he has cheated.

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