Matthew 10:7—15

It is probably strange to hear this morning’s gospel text in light of the current state of our world. As you go, proclaim the good news, ‘The kingdom of heaven has come near.’[1] Scenes of evangelism may be a challenge for us all right now. Rather than being sent out into the world, we find ourselves compelled to remain at home and distance ourselves from those we might otherwise wish to serve, up close and in person. We are not presently going, there are no homes into which we might safely venture, no opportunities for face to face discussion, study, or prayer.

Yet we still hear Jesus’s call, even in the midst of a crisis that would see us shrink back and retreat from the world to which we have been called to bring God’s love. Go.

Thankfully various technologies—especially the internet—have afforded us valuable ways to overcome the sharpness of our physical separation from one another. Although I count myself among the world’s stubborn luddites, I cannot imagine rising to meet the present moment without the advantages of our own community’s presence on social media and other web interfaces. Much like those Christians of the fifteenth century, who experienced for the first time a new kind of evangelistic media (the printing press), we have heretofore unexplored worlds of potential set before us. Read More

Br. Jim WoodrumJames 3:1-23

There was once a young man who was beginning his spiritual journey in the religious life.  He sought the council of an old man who was well versed in spirituality, and asked him what all he must do to live a disciplined religious life.  The old man opened his Psalter and read the first verse of Psalm 39:  I said, I will keep watch upon my ways, so that I do not offend with my tongue.  “STOP!” cried the young man as the older was about to proceed; “when I have learned that I will come and receive further rules.”  And so he went away and at the end of six months, the older man, curious about the progress of the younger, sought him out and asked, “Are you ready to continue with the other lessons?”  “Not yet,” he replied. “I have not yet mastered the first one.”  Another five years passed and curiously the older man again sought out the younger. This time the young man replied, “I have no need of the other lessons, for, having learned that first rule, to master the tongue, I have gained discipline and control over my whole nature.”[i]

The past couple of Sundays, we have been hearing portions of the Letter of James.  I am struck by one of the Letter’s reoccurring themes: let everyone be quick to listen, slow to speak, slow to anger; for your anger does not produce God’s righteousness; if any think they are religious, and do not bridle their tongues but deceive their hearts, their religion is worthless.[ii]  Considered “Wisdom Literature” of the New Testament, the author of the Letter is admonishing his audience to put right words into right action. Certainly, he seems to know something about the nature of speech. His use of metaphor instantly captures our imaginations and brings into focus a truth that is both easy to comprehend yet difficult to master. This morning we read:  Anyone who makes no mistakes in speaking is perfect, able to keep the whole body in check with a bridle.  Bits in the mouths of horses, small rudders guiding large ships, great forests being set ablaze by small sparks: all of these poetically call into question our mastery over this small, unruly member of our body: the tongue.  With it, he says, we bless the Lord and Father, and with it we curse those who are made in the likeness of God. From the same mouth come blessing and cursing. You might summarize this major theme of James’ Letter this way:  words matter.  What is your experience of this?  What metaphor would you use to illustrate the power of speech?  How have you come to know that words matter? Read More

We celebrate today the great feast, the “solemnity” of the Epiphany, otherwise known as “The Manifestation of Christ to the Gentiles.” “Gentiles”, meaning all the peoples of the world other than the twelve tribes of ancient Israel.  The Three Wise Men, the Magi, these emissaries from somewhere, represent the peoples of the world not of the twelve tribes.  These Wise Men led by a star discover the Creator of the stars of night.  And not in one of Herod’s sumptuous palaces, but in an unexpected place. Read More