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Posts Tagged ‘Weakness’

The Risk of Vulnerability – Br. David Vryhof

Br. David Vryhof

(The Sending of the Seventy)

Luke 10: 1-11, 16-20

Given what the gospels report about Jesus’ twelve disciples – how they were often slow to comprehend the message of the kingdom, and repeatedly failed to live by its principles – it seems to me that Jesus is taking quite a risk here in commissioning these seventy to go out as his representatives.  If the twelve he had chosen to be his closest friends and companions were having trouble grasping the message, how was this lot supposed to get it right?  What training did they have?  Who was going to supervise them or hold them accountable? How could he be sure they were capable of representing him, or that they would be faithful to his message?  Had he had a chance to test their theology?  Had he checked their backgrounds?  Had he measured their commitment, or tested their reliability?  But here he is, entrusting them with the message of the kingdom and empowering them to heal in his name.

It seems that Jesus was willing to take chances. He was willing to place heavenly treasure in fragile earthen vessels.  He was willing to turn them loose, to send them out, to let them speak, without being certain of the outcome.  And, not surprisingly, he’s still doing that today – sending each of us out to be messengers of that Good News; asking us, despite our weaknesses and shortcomings, to be his ambassadors in the world; proclaiming, through us, that “the kingdom of God has come near.”

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Whenever I am weak, then am I strong – Br. Geoffrey Tristram

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Br. Geoffrey Tristram

I Corinthians 1:18-25

Eighteen months ago, during my sabbatical, I spent a week in southwest France at Lourdes.  I’d wanted to go to Lourdes for many years, to see what it is like and to try to understand why so many people have found it a place of healing and hope.  I could talk for hours about my experiences there, but there was one thing that moved me more than anything else.  It was the sight of hundreds of men and women in wheelchairs, being pushed with such respect, kindness and tenderness by mostly young men and women, some students, from all around the world.  What was so clear, and really wonderful, was that here at Lourdes, those who were weak, sick, broken, disabled, were honored and really given pride of place.  In most places in our society today, where power and wealth and success are trumpeted, the sick, the broken, the weak, the disabled, are so often marginalized and even hidden away.  But not at Lourdes.

It made me think back to my late teens when I was considering Christianity.  What most attracted me to the Christian faith was that it could embrace and make sense of suffering, sickness, failure and weakness.  Humanism really couldn’t explain it at all – they rather got in the way.

Worshipping with men and women in wheelchairs, laughing and joking with them over a glass of Guiness, listening to their stories of faith and trust, and frankly getting in touch with my own weakness and need for healing was, I think, at the heart of the extraordinarily Suffering sense of holiness I felt there.  It was unforgettable. Read More

Keep Awake – Br. Lucas Hall

Mark 13:24-37

The sun is setting. The night has begun. The season of Advent marks the start of the new Church year, and, like the Jewish day that begins once the sun has descended, our year begins with the night season.

Advent is a season of looking ahead. We anticipate the coming of the Lord both in our looking forward to the commemoration of his birth, as well as our hopeful belief in his coming again. It is, therefore, a season of the affirmation of our Christian faith and joy.

But the night is dark. The night is cold, and lonely, and we have not been given leave to rest until the warm embrace of the new dawn. Indeed, it is exactly the opposite. Christ gives us the order: “Keep awake.”1 Our Lord gives us this command, to keep watch at the door for his return. He does not even give us the time of his coming back, assuring us only that “about that day or hour no one knows.”1 There is no known end to the tunnel, no hour at which we can punch out and leave our shift at the night watch. We simply must watch, and wait. And lest we think we might have the sweet comfort or stimulating diversion of impermanent things, Christ tells us that “heaven and earth shall pass away.”1 All things will crumble; all things will fade. Read More

A Radical Act (Maundy Thursday sermon) – Br. David Vryhof

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Br. David Vryhof

John 13:1-17, 31b-35

Some years ago I had the privilege of taking a course with Dr. Stanley Hauerwas, a theologian who was then on the faculty of the Divinity School at Duke University.  Dr. Hauerwas, the son of a bricklayer, was a straight-shooting, no-nonsense kind of guy who believed that living as true disciples of Jesus in the world would necessarily put us in conflict with the culture in which we live.  I remember being surprised to hear him say that participating in the Eucharist was one of the most radical actions any Christian could undertake.  Tonight we will understand why this is true.

Tonight we watch in wonder as the only-begotten Son of God, the Eternal Word who was “in the beginning with God” and through whom “all things came into being” (Jn 1:1-3), stoops to wash the dirty feet of his disciples.  Tonight we behold the Incarnate Son of God, the “King of kings” and the “Lord of lords,” tying a towel around himself, pouring water into a basin, and assuming the role of a servant.  The King kneels before his subjects; the Master washes the feet of his disciples. Read More

On a Mission from God – Br. David Vryhof

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davidv150x150In his Spiritual Exercises, St Ignatius of Loyola asks us to imagine a charismatic leader whom we admire and whose life and mission have been an inspiration to us.  Think for a moment of who this person might be for you.  Whom do you admire?  Who has inspired you?… You believe in this person’s values and priorities.  You admire his/her integrity.  You are convinced that the cause he/she represents is so true, so important, so worthy, that you are ready to offer your full support.

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